Rachel Garber

STUFF

Our regional eco-centre is open again for the season, at 105 Maine Central, Bury. You can take an amazing array of stuff there and ditch it in good conscience. An Eco-centre is not a dump. There’s a place for everything, and an attendant makes sure everything goes in its place.
Hazardous stuff, like aerosol spray bottles, paint cans, batteries and even car batteries, acids, propane tanks, oil, fluorescent tubes or bulbs. Big stuff: tires (without rims), construction materials, all kinds of metals. Garden debris, leaves, and branches less than five feet long. All kinds of electronics, all kinds of styrofoam, all kinds of fabrics and textiles. Plastic tubing. Infant seats. Even household appliances, including fridges.
What a relief to know everything is going to the best possible afterlife, reused or recycled! That’s one thing I learned at YouTube/@mouvementjyparticipe9212, in a little video of less than three minutes. Ok, it was posted three years ago, and has had only 176 views in that time. It deserves more, just like the Eco-centre itself deserves more visits.
The centre is free for MRC residents, and if you bring them stuff, each year they let you take one load of good garden compost home with you. A good deal!
Questions? Call the Eco-centre at 819-560-8404. Visiting hours: Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., from April 12 to November.
Especially, call first if you’re looking to dispose of asphalt shingles; dangerous items such as PCBs, cyanides, radioactive waste, or explosives; biomedical waste – syringes, needles, tubes, medications; animal carcasses; Ammunition; contaminated earth; tires mounted on rims. The eco-centre does not have a place for this stuff, but they can tell you what to do. For details, visit cavaouwebapp.recyc-quebec.gouv.qc.ca.
ADVENTURE WITH BERNIE
I’m having a great time reading Bernie Epps’ first volume of The Eastern Townships Adventure, which takes us up to 1837. I’m learning how hairy the times were when the British Land Act was parceling out townships in “The Wastelands of the Crown” to would-be settlers.
Yes, that’s what they called the Eastern Townships―wastelands.
I’m back in 1792, when three million acres in our region were up for grabs, and 19 out of every 20 petitioners for land were Americans. The call for settlers “had made no mention of loyalists but all these Americans caused enough concern that the land committee classified them in order of merit,” Bernie wrote. Six categories of merit began with “loyalists who have suffered from their attachment to the King’s Government,” and ended with “petitioners who have no particular pretensions to the King’s Bounty” but who want to settle the land immediately.
Well, long story short, Sawyerville’s own Josiah Sawyer fell into this last category; he’d even fought against the British during the American revolution. Yet he finally gained the right to settle the Eaton Township through his proof of industry and his success in recruiting associate settlers.
I always wondered why the British came up with the system of a principal leader for each township who was responsible for a group of associates. In part, it was to make one person responsible for paying surveying fees, building a mill, and opening roads. In compensation, he would receive extra land. At the same time, they hoped to create “a stabilizing landed aristocracy in the New World.”
The discretionary power of the land committee to achieve this goal “was the loophole through which speculators charged en masse and shattered all efforts to ensure the land was given to people who would clear, cultivate, and populate it. By 1807, it had resulted in more than 1,400,000 acres being awarded to some 60 senior officials, merchant princes, and other large landholders who had no intention of settling on them,” wrote Epps.
What a mess!
And, oh, Bernie, the footnotes!
One trenchant footnote summed up the Canadian career of a member of the British aristocracy in the 1790s, one Edward Augustus, Duke of Kent, King George III’s fourth son; not spectacular, by Bernie’s account. Afterwards, he was posted to the West Indies. “Since the St. Lawrence would be frozen until spring, the Duke resolved to sail from Boston and consequently loaded his campaign baggage―his camp cots and tents, his maps and books, his elegant uniforms, vintage wines and silver tea service―aboard two heavy sleighs.
«In a graceful cariole, Edward Augustus led this procession up the Richelieu but when they reached Lake Champlain, the ice gave way and his sleighs sank with all his baggage. He reached Burlington with little more than the clothes on his back.»
Here’s the footnote:
“The Duke of Kent was next assigned to Halifax where his brother had previously dallied with the wife of New Hampshire’s ex-governor, John Wentworth. Edward Augustus wanted to be appointed Canada’s governor general but was reassigned to Gibraltar where he continued to make life miserable for his troops. Finally, at fifty-two, he put aside Julie St. Laurent, his mistress, married the usual German princess and fathered Queen Victoria.”
Oh, Bernie! You really weren’t a monarchist, were you?
CANTERBURY FLEA MARKET
Tony De Melo of the Canterbury Cultural Centre is looking for items for the May 18-19 flea market. “Old, new, used, vintage or antique items in good condition are welcome,” he wrote. “We do not accept large pieces of furniture, appliances or clothing.” All proceeds are for restoration and regular maintenance of the Canterbury Centre at 1095 Victoria Road (Route 214), Bury. Info: 819-872-3400.
CHURCHES
United. Services are 9:30 a.m. in Cookshire, and 11 a.m. in Sawyerville. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. Sunday Services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m., at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. No services in Cookshire. To find services in the deanery, check the schedule at deaneryofstfrancis.com/calendar/. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by April 15 for publication April 24.

Rachel Garber

HAPPY 50th!

Just published―the Townships Sun’s 50th Anniversary Legacy Edition, a full 52 pages of stories and images reflecting on the life and times of this “small yet mighty magazine.”
Those are the words of Marie Moliner, its 50th Anniversary Coordinator and Assistant Editor, who led the team organizing a celebration of the edition’s launch at Uplands Cultural & Heritage Centre on March 19th. A full 50 Townships Sun volunteers, partners, contributors, and donors attended and received a complimentary copy of the special edition.
The Townships Sun was first published on February 8, 1974, during a period of great social and political change in the Eastern Townships. Its parent organization was the Eastern Townships Social Action Group (ETSAG), formed to support the English-speaking communities in the region, preceding Townshippers’ Association.
The Anniversary Edition recounts the Sun’s story over the past five decades through a variety of articles, photos, and graphics by many of the same people involved over the years: Russell Pocock, Susan Mastine, Libbey Griffith, Bernard Epps, and Charles Bury, Gladys Beattie, Barbara Verity, Scott Stevenson, David “Skip” Wright, and many others.
Over the years, more than a few of the volunteers were, or are, Haut-Saint-Françiscans. In fact, the official Townships Sun logo depicts the twin mountains on our eastern horizon, Mont-Mégantic and Mont-Saint-Joseph. Artist Stephanie Wells drew it, based on the view from her house in Scotstown.
Begun as a tabloid, the Sun was transformed into its current magazine format in 2007. An editorial team of Nancy Beattie, Charles Bury, Brenda Hartwell, and others led it then. More recent editors were Rod Leggett, Gordon Lambie, and Barbara Heath, editor for six years until she passed away in 2021, when I took on the role as my retirement gig, albeit a volunteer job.
This retrospective edition was built on the foundation of our archives project last year. I discovered all kinds of riches during my review of all 50 years of the magazine. Earlier themes concerning living as an English speaker in the Townships as the French language predominates gave way to concerns about the environment, and health and social issues. But also the natural beauty of the Townships, and, as described in Angela Leuck’s article, culture―arts and literature―have always remained important.
The history of our little community magazine is intertwined with the tumultuous story of English-speaking people in the Townships over the past 50 years. I think it will be a good read for many years to come!
Back issues of the Townships Sun are available online by googling “BAnQ Townships Sun.”
The 50th Anniversary Edition is twice the size of the Sun’s usual issues, and cost about twice as much to print.
It could not have been created without the support of the magazine’s 50th Anniversary Partners―Blanchard Litho, Global Excel, English Language Arts Network, Quebec Anglophone Heritage Network, and Townshippers’ Association―and more than 60 individual donors. We are very grateful!
The Townships Sun’s 50th Anniversary Legacy Edition is in the mail to subscribers and on the magazine stands at the Cookshire IGA and the Dépanneur C.P.L. Lachance in Sawyerville. Until April 30, copies of this special 52-page colour edition are available for $2.50; after April 30, they become collectors’ items, and will be sold for $5 each. If any are left. To get yours now, subscribe at TownshipsSun.ca.
Look lively. The next edition about the eclipse and our waterways is coming out at at the beginning of April.
ODD FELLOWS
The Odd Fellows of Eaton Valley Lodge #60 in Sawyerville are organizing a Pancake Supper fundraiser on Saturday, April 6, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Sawyerville Catholic Church Hall. Pancakes, eggs, grilled potatoes, baked beans, bacon, sausage, ham, and more. Tickets are $20 (adults); $10 (ages 6-12), and free for children under 5.
For tickets, call Barry Berwick (819-889-2597) or Tami Spires (819-452-3685). When reserving, please say whether you are dining in or taking out.
ECLIPSE!
Providing no clouds are in the way, the Haut-Saint-François offers prime viewing of the April 8th solar eclipse. We’re situated right in the centre of the path of totality.
For us, totality begins at 3:28:02 and ends 3:31:32 p.m. (3 minutes, 30 seconds). The moon begins to move across the face of the sun at 2:16:59, and finishes at 4:37 p.m. So says eclipse.org.
The MRC has organized a free activity in La Patrie from 1 to 4 p.m., with a large-screen broadcast of a special program from the Mont-Mégantic Astrolab and free eclipse eyewear for up to 1,800 people. Eleven other municipalities offer similar activities, including Bury, Dudswell, Newport, and St-Isidore-de-Clifton. For details, google mrchsf.com/evenements/eclipse-totale-dans-le-haut/, have a cup of tea while the page opens, and read all about it… in French. Then just relax while the sun takes a nap!
CANTERBURY FLEA MARKET
Tony De Melo of the Canterbury Cultural Centre is once again looking for items for the May 18-19 flea market. “Old, new, used, vintage or antique items in good condition are welcome,” he wrote. “We do not accept large pieces of furniture, appliances or clothing.”
All proceeds are for restoration and regular maintenance of the church―i.e. the Canterbury Centre at 1095 Victoria Road (Route 214), Bury. For more information, contact Tony at 819-872-3400.
CHURCHES
Baptist. Sunday Services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m., at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. No services in Cookshire. To find services in the deanery, check the schedule at deaneryofstfrancis.com/calendar/. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. March 31st: Sunrise service at the Eaton Corner Gazebo, at 6:20 a.m., followed by a potluck breakfast at the Sawyerville United Church. Easter Sunday service with communion is at 10:30 a.m. at the Trinity United Church. April 7: Services are 9:30 a.m. in Cookshire, and 11 a.m. in Sawyerville. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by March 28 for publication April 10.

Rachel Garber

B=BOOKS

A book club in the boonies?
I must confess I’ve never been part of a book club before, but as Colleen talked to me about her idea, I began to feel excited.
That’s Colleen McInerney. She moved to Saint-Malo from the Montreal area a few years ago during the Covid pandemic. Last week, she reached out to the Sawyerville Librarian, Ann Rothfels, who popped off an email to Rachel Writes: Are there any book clubs around here for people reading books in English?
I couldn’t think of any. Colleen emailed that she’d be interested in starting one up, and she offered a meeting space for the group. I called her to find out what she has in mind.
She said she’d never been in a book club either, so she’s been talking to people about how they run their book clubs. She discovered it can be hard to get enough books for everyone to read the same book at the same time. A library rarely has more than one copy. So, she thought, “why not just ask everyone to bring the book they’re reading, and have an exchange, kind of like CBC’s Canada Reads?”
“Just bring what you have read, and we can talk about it. We could do book exchanges, too. Or the members could discuss it, and maybe if everyone agrees, they could read something together on Kindle. Anything is possible. The main thing is to have an intellectual and social gathering of people who like books.”
Colleen used to live in the McGill Ghetto in Montreal, in a cooperative. She’s envisaging a book club along the lines of a little cooperative. “I know how to cooperate,” she laughed.
“We could meet once a month, or maybe once every three weeks, to follow the library’s schedule. We could decide at the first meeting how we want to do it.”
Basically, she is thirsty for the kind of cultural and social contacts she used to have in the Ghetto. She participated in the Literacy in Action “Migration” events in Eaton Corner and Lennoxville. “I know it’s fun to create with others,” she said. She’s eager to meet people who are also interested in the arts and literature.
On the other hand, Colleen has a lot of appreciation for her new surroundings. You can hear it in her voice, as she gives directions. “You just go up Route 253, it’s the next village over from Sawyerville. Then you go four kilometres on a dirt road. It’s beautiful, through the woods. I live on Lake Lindsay. A hundred years ago, there was a small lumber mill here, run by steam. It’s really a pleasant place to meet, outside on good days, or inside.”
She says she’s interested in getting to know writers as well as readers. I was supposed to be interviewing her, but very quickly, I found Colleen was asking me about my writing. I was able, though, to find out she has written and self-published “a little book with a big title: An A―Z Guide to Reinventing Yourself with Passion and Zeal in the 21st Century.”
“It’s amazing. A painting I did is on the cover, and now I’ve ended up living in a similar scene! It’s kind of synchronistic. The book is based on common sense, but also some life experiences and learning I had, and a near-death experience. But I did create a life I enjoy very, very much.”
Her book is for sale on Amazon, where you can preview the entries for A and B. Under “B” are “Balance” and “Beliefs.” I suspect if I read further, I would soon come to “Book Club!” It’s all part of creating a life you enjoy very, very much.
To find out more, contact Colleen at 819-658-1078 or colleenmcinerney51@gmail.com.
50th ANNIVERSARY
When Colleen began interviewing me, I had a chance to tell her about the Townships Sun, and that I am its editor. Did you know this year marks the 50th anniversary of this magazine? It started in 1972, and this month’s “legacy” edition is super fat―a full 52 pages. To fill those pages, I’ve been looking back through some 14,000 pages of the magazine from February 1974 to February 2024. And I’ve asked some long-ago contributors to write about their experiences. Altogether, it makes an engrossing story, the Townships English-speaking community and its little magazine.
So that’s why the March issue is late hitting the magazine stands. During the week of March 18th, look for your copy at the Cookshire IGA or the Dépanneur C.P.L. Lachance.
BILINGUAL TAX SERVICE
Last chance to use the bilingual income tax assistance program in Sawyerville, open to persons with limited income, free of charge. This service is organized by the Loisirs de Sawyerville, and is part of the Community Volunteer Income Tax Program organized by the Canada Revenue Agency. Danielle, Francine, and Suzanne will still welcome you on Wednesday afternoons, March 13 and 20, from 1 to 6 p.m. and March 27, from 1 to 4 p.m., at the Catholic church in Sawyerville, Église Notre-Dame-du-Rosaire, 4 Randboro Road. Use the back door to enter the basement. Info: Danielle, 819-889-2614.
CHURCHES
Anglican. No services in Cookshire. To find services in the deanery, check the schedule at deaneryofstfrancis.com/calendar/. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. Usual Sunday services are 9:30 a.m. at the Trinity United Church (Cookshire), and 11 a.m. at the Sawyerville United Church. On March 24, these will Palm Sunday services. On March 31st are planned a Sunrise service at the Eaton Corner Gazebo, at 6:15 a.m., and an Easter Sunday service with communion at 10:30 a.m. at the Trinity United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. Sunday Services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m., at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by March 18 for publication March 27.

Rachel Garber

ARTS, EVEN

Into my email box every morning comes a little news digest of items of interest to persons of illicit language in Quebec. It’s in English, but includes items from news outlets in both French and English. For example, I learned yesterday what Clifford Lincoln said about English signage around Premier Legault’s Montreal office, and that the Montreal mayor said French is a “unifying link.”
Looking east, I discover the Francophone population of New Brunswick is growing; one-third of newcomers in 2022 primarily spoke French. And west, Winnipeg’s Festival du Voyageur celebrates Louis Riel Day and rights for minority languages in Manitoba. And right here, Élections Québec is investigating political donations made by a grieving couple in exchange for a meeting with Quebec’s transport minister.
For someone like me who believes the arts and nature are the real business of life, politics can be entertaining. Sort of. I acknowledge that politics, economics, education, health, and other societal issues can have devastating consequences for those who make art and champion nature. So I’m happy to receive a little daily digest to keep me au courant, with links to further reading.
The Daily Briefing emails come from the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN), the mother ship of English-speaking community groups in Quebec. The emails are free and open to all. You are invited to subscribe at membership.qcgn.ca/en/daily-briefing.
The service began 25 years ago, and is now open to all English-speaking Quebecers. QCGN’s Communications Director Rita Legault noted their aim is to offer information about issues of concern to our communities. It gives short summaries of QCGN news items as well as news published in the media about various topics relating to language, politics, social issues, and more.
Even, sometimes, the arts!
SELF-CARE, WELL-BEING
Mental Health Estrie invites us to a workshop series “Improving Your Relationship with Yourself” with Risha Dave (she/her), Registered Psychotherapist, Canadian Certified Counsellor, and former MHE employee. These virtual workshops are free, open to all, and in English.
Self-Care Practices to Improve Overall Well-Being is the topic on Wednesday, February 28, and Decolonizing Self-Care is on Wednesday, March 6. Both are from 6:30 to 8 p.m. “In a society that values productivity, many of us find it difficult to prioritize rest. Join us as we take a deep dive into some of the barriers that make it difficult to care for ourselves,” MHE says. For info, or to register, email outreach@mentalhealthestrie.com, or call 819-565-2388.
TOWNSHIPS YOUNG VOICES
Last call! The deadline is February 29 for submissions to the Townships Young Voices Awards. A total of $3,000 is to be shared by 15 award recipients aged 11 to 29, who create short fiction, nonfiction, poetry, art, or photos for magazines. For info, let your fingertips do the walking to TownshipsSun.ca/Townships-Young-Voices. That’s where you will find the guidelines and a quick and easy online submission form. Info: TownshipsYoungVoices@gmail.com.
BULWER CARD PARTIES
Upcoming March 12 and 26, April 9 and 23, and May 7 and 21: Card parties for seniors, with a light lunch, hosted by the Bulwer Golden Agers at the Bulwer Community Centre, 254 Jordan Hill Road, Bulwer. Activities include cribbage, carpet bowling, and cards. The parties are every two weeks on Tuesdays from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. New members are welcome. Info: Peggy & Leigh Grapes, 819-875-3543.
BILINGUAL TAX SERVICE
A bilingual income tax assistance program in Sawyerville assists persons with limited income, free of charge. Trained volunteers prepare both Canada and Quebec returns. This service is organized by the Loisirs de Sawyerville, and is part of the Community Volunteer Income Tax Program organized by the Canada Revenue Agency. It starts March 6.
To use the Community Volunteer Income Tax Service, you must be: (1) a single person with a maximum annual revenue of $35,000; (2) a couple with a maximum revenue of $45,000, plus $2,500 for each dependant; or (3) a single parent with a child, with a maximum revenue of $45,000 plus $2,500 for each additional dependant. Income from interest should not exceed $1,000. Persons with income from self-employment, bankruptcy, or deceased persons are not eligible.
The Sawyerville income tax assistance program features the same team of volunteers as in the past – Danielle, Francine, and Suzanne. On Wednesday afternoons, March 6 and 27, from 1 to 4 p.m., and March 13 and 20, from 1 to 6 p.m., they will be waiting for you at the Catholic church in Sawyerville, Église Notre-Dame-du-Rosaire, 4 Randboro Road. Use the back door to enter the basement. Check last issue’s Rachel Writes for details on what to bring. Info: Danielle, 819-889-2614.
CAREGIVERS’ GROUP
The Centre d’Action Bénévole du Haut-Saint-François (CAB) asks if you provide support to a member of your entourage at a psychological, physical or psychosocial or other level. Is the support provided continuous or occasional, short or long term and is it offered on a non-professional basis?
Is the support in the form of help such as transportation, personal care, housework, emotional support? Does it also lead to financial repercussions for the caregiver? Does your caregiving limit your ability to take care of yourself and your physical and mental health, or to assume your other responsibilities?
If so, the CAB welcomes you to a group that gives you a chance to talk about what you are going through, share information about resources, or enjoy an outing to recharge your batteries. In English. Info: Nathalie Ledoux, 819-238-8541.
CHURCHES
United. Sunday services are 9:30 a.m. at the Trinity United Church (Cookshire), and 11 a.m. at the Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. Sunday Services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m., at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. No services in Cookshire. To find services in the deanery, check the schedule at deaneryofstfrancis.com/calendar/. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by March 4 for publication March 13.

ACTU-Rachel

I AM XANIA

Wanted: Creative youth aged 11 to 29 who live in the Eastern Townships.
Do you enjoy making art? Taking photos? Putting words together into poetry? Maybe combining poetry and image? Creating a short story? Researching and writing a nonfiction piece?
If so, here’s your chance to take part in the new Townships Young Voices Awards organized by the Townships Sun magazine. The works of 15 winners will be published in the July-August 2024 Townships Sun. Plus, they will share in awards totalling $3,000: $450 for first prize in each of the five categories; $100 for second prize winners, and $50 for third prizes.
February 29. That’s the deadline for submission, just two weeks from now. So quick―send your clicky finger to find the guidelines and submission forms at TownshipsSun.ca/Townships-Young-Voices.
Something new this year: TYVoices has a communications agent to help get the word out to individuals, schools, and community groups. Her name is Xania Keane, and she lives right here in the Haut-Saint-François; in Newport, to be exact. She’s one of our newest Haut-Saint-Franciscans, having moved here last year from Montreal.
Xania is a creative powerhouse! Her art is vibrant. She’s created cover art for two recent issues of the Townships Sun, one in September 2023 on the theme of childhood, and another for this month’s issue. (More about that in a minute.)
Her writing is captivating, frank and fun. She’s written a book entitled Lupita’s Misadventures Across Canada. Intriguingly, it’s from the viewpoint of Lupita, her family’s minivan.
She’s a musician, too, and tap-dancing performer with two European tours under her belt. She has created a bunch of music videos. No matter her media, she has a distinctive voice all her own. You can see more of our new neighbour and her many gifts at her website, iamxania.com.
Most of all, check out Instagram/tyvoices to see what Xania has to say about Townships Young Voices!
THE 50TH, PART 1
Part 1 of the 50th Anniversary celebration in print―the February issue of the Townships Sun―is on the magazine stands at the Cookshire IGA and the Dépanneur Lachance in Sawyerville. You can’t miss the really sunny cover by Xania Keane, a drawing that riffs off the first images ever published in the Townships Sun of 50 years ago. The first Sun logo peers over the horizon of the Coaticook Gorge, and inside the magazine are those two original images. They’re part of the first-ever Townships Sun edition, published February 8, 1974, and reprinted in this issue.
If you don’t want to miss Part II, the 52-page 50th Anniversary Legacy edition in full colour, subscribe now at TownshipsSun.ca/Subscribe. It’s slated for publication March 15.
OL’ TOM STORIES
Ever since he played the role of Ol’ Hugh in the 2019 play, Pilgarlic, John Mackley has been working on a collection of stories of historical fiction set in the village of Brookbury, the Township of Bury, and the surrounding area. But Ol’ Tom is a very different character from Ol’ Hugh. Ol’ Tom Stories tells about the early 20th century experiences of Thomas Ian McKenzie, his family, and the greater community. Angela Leuck of Shoreline Press plans to publish Ol’ Tom Stories in the summer of 2024. Stand by for more news.
BILINGUAL TAX SERVICE
A bilingual income tax assistance program in Sawyerville assists persons with limited income, free of charge. Trained volunteers prepare both Canada and Quebec returns. This service is organized by the Loisirs de Sawyerville, and is part of the Community Volunteer Income Tax Program organized by the Canada Revenue Agency.
ELIGIBLE?
To use the Community Volunteer Income Tax Service, you must be: (1) a single person with a maximum annual revenue of $35,000; (2) a couple with a maximum revenue of $45,000, plus $2,500 for each dependant; or (3) a single parent with a child, with a maximum revenue of $45,000 plus $2,500 for each additional dependant. Income from interest should not exceed $1,000. Persons with income from self-employment, bankruptcy, or deceased persons are not eligible.
SAWYERVILLE SERVICE
The Sawyerville income tax assistance program features the same team of volunteers as in the past – Danielle, Francine, and Suzanne.
When? Wednesday afternoons, March 6 and 27, from 1 to 4 p.m., and March 13 and 20, from 1 to 6 p.m.
Where? At the Catholic church in Sawyerville, Église Notre-Dame-du-Rosaire, 4 Randboro Road. Use the back door to enter the basement.
What to bring? You will need: (1) any papers you received from the Canada Revenue Agency and Revenu Québec in the past months, and your last Notices of Assessment; (2) your T4 and Relevé slips from your employer, or any other forms you received regarding income or tuition; (3) the RL-31 form from your landlord, if you are a renter. House owners will need their property tax number, which is on the municipal property tax bill.
Bring receipts for any payments you made for pills, dentist visits, glasses, or other health expenses. (Tip: Your pharmacy can give you a printout listing your pharmaceutical costs for the year.) These expenses may give you a tax credit.
Persons age 70 or older should inquire about a refundable tax credit for expenses incurred to continue living independently. Bring your home maintenance expenses, including purchasing, leasing or installing eligible equipment or fixtures, or staying in a functional rehabilitation transition unit.
If you need any information, call Danielle at 819-889-2614.
CHURCHES
Baptist. Sunday Services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m., at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. No services in Cookshire. To find services in the deanery, check the schedule at deaneryofstfrancis.com/calendar/. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. Sunday services are 9:30 a.m. at the Trinity United Church (Cookshire), and 11 a.m. at the Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by February 19 for publication February 28.

ACTU-Rachel

MR. & MRS. BULWER BULWER

Bulwer is in their blood, so to speak.
We’re talking about Leigh and Peggy Grapes, the movers and shakers behind the Bulwer Community Centre and the Bulwer Golden Agers. On their Facebook page, “Bulwer Bulwer,” Peggy wishes “Mr. Bulwer Bulwer” happy birthday. We know who she means.
The Bulwer Community Centre at 254 Jordan Hill Road was formed in 1963; the Golden Agers in 1983. “I felt a family obligation to keep it going,” Leigh said.
“Leigh’s grandfather was involved in building the Bulwer Elementary School,” Peggy continued. It was built in 1963. When the school closed, they turned it into a community centre.”
“It doesn’t belong to the municipality. It belongs to the community,” Leigh emphasized. “We’re a non-profit organization. My dad spent all his extra time there. He was devoted to it.”
Leigh, and both his parents, went to school there. “In the 60s and 70s and 80s, there were lots of English-speaking people in the area,” he said. “There are still a few of us who went to school there. For example, Sharon Moore, Robert Richardson, Clayton Lackie, Barry McElravy, Richard Rothney and his family.”
Or was it Peggy who said that? I was speaking to them by phone, and they had a charming way of completing each other’s sentences.
Leigh had a career as a truck driver for Kruger Inc., then a repair technician for Dorson. “He spends his time now helping as president of the Eaton Cemetery, the Bulwer Community Centre, and the Bulwer Golden Agers. And in his free time, he helps out as a farm hand for a neighbour,” Peggy emailed me.
Peggy worked as a dressmaker when their children were young, and then qualified as a home care assistant in 1990. Many times, she wrote, she was holding down three jobs of home care, cooking for the Bulwer Golden Agers, and catering weddings with her brother Perry Hodge on weekends.
“You gotta do something or your mind turns to mush,” Peggy laughs. “I love to cook.”
“Seniors need something to do to keep their minds alert,” Leigh says. “After the pandemic, people were anxious to get out, to socialize.”
He has similar interests. “I like to talk to people, and I have a special attachment to the community centre.”
That brings us back to the Golden Agers. The group has 47 members, and on average, 30 or 35 people attend the bi-weekly card parties from September to June. Peggy’s been cooking for the group since the 1990s. They had hot meals until the Covid pandemic; now they offer a cold buffet. They had a crowd of 50 for a turkey supper at Christmastime, and offer a cold supper at the season’s end in June.
The food comes after the games: cards, cribbage and carpet bowling. Carpet bowling is like shuffleboard, on a felt mat about five feet wide and 35 feet long. Last year, the group bought a “new” used mat from a Golden Age group in Roseneathe, Ontario. They had lost lots of seniors to Covid.
“The CAB donated money last year for the mat,” Peggy said.
“It’s very expensive felt, from France,” Leigh explained. “They also gave us a bingo machine, but our seniors prefer to play cards.”
“Money is a struggle,” he said. “We had to change the windows in the centre. That helped with the heating.”
“We had activities to raise funds for that,” said Peggy.
The old school house had never been insulated. They―Leigh, Peggy, and Jeff Sylvester―tore the walls off, and then hired a company to put in foam insulation and re-build the walls. This past winter they also put in a new furnace. “The building is in good shape now,” said Leigh.
“Our MNA, Mr. Jacques, gave us a grant for that,” said Leigh.
“It’s hard to keep it going,” Peggy said. “We try to keep rental costs down, to get a few more rentals to help pay for upkeep, to keep our head above water.”
“Anything else you’d like to say?” I ask. I don’t remember who answered, but the message is clear.
“If anybody would like to make a donation, the address is the Bulwer Community Centre, 254 Jordon Hill Road, Cookshire-Eaton, QC J0B 1MO.”
I really enjoyed my interview with “Mr. and Mrs. Bulwer Bulwer.”


Both the CAB and our new editor-in-chief, Stephanie Paquet, suggested I interview the Grapes in relation to the “ainés en action” theme of this week’s Journal. I googled the term, and found another interesting mention. It’s Ainés Action Quebec, or in English, “Seniors Action Quebec.” Its mission is to “maintain and enhance the vitality of English-speaking Quebec seniors” and promote a healthy and active lifestyle.
How? The answer is at seniorsactionquebec.ca. Check it out.
BULWER CARD PARTIES
Every two weeks on Tuesdays from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m., the Bulwer Golden Agers group hosts card parties and a light lunch at the Bulwer Community Centre, 254 Jordan Hill Road, Bulwer. Activities include cribbage, carpet bowling, and cards. Dates of the upcoming meetings are January 30, February 13 and 27, March 12 and 26, April 9 and 23, and May 7 and 21. New members are welcome.
Info: Peggy & Leigh Grapes, 819-875-3543.
YOGA
Yoga-light classes have begun in Sawyerville on Tuesdays at 10 a.m. in the Sawyerville Catholic Church basement, 4 Randboro Road. Info: Myrna at myrnamac44@gmail.com, or 819-875-5393.
CHURCHES
Anglican. No services in Cookshire. To find services in the deanery, check the schedule at deaneryofstfrancis.com/calendar/. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. Sunday services are 9:30 a.m. at the Trinity United Church (Cookshire), and 11 a.m. at the Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. Sunday Services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m., at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by February 5 for publication February 14.

Rachel

SWISH, SWISH

When my father’s father died of pneumonia, the nurse tried in vain to wrest his teeth out of his mouth. They were so perfect, she was sure they were false.
My father’s choppers were pretty perfect, too. Laughing and smiling, he flashed them, I think, with a bit of pride. He brushed them regularly, I remember. Swish, swish.
My mother’s teeth seemed perfect as well, but were, alas, quite false. After her third baby during the Great Depression, with not enough money for calcium supplements or dental care, she visited the dentist and had them all pulled out in one fell swoop.
My teeth? Somewhere between those two extremes. A few years ago, I declined to have $3000-worth of work done in my mouth, and took a cheaper option, just $858. My dentist, an idealistic new graduate, was aghast. She warned me not to chew with the tooth so inadequately repaired.
What a hard decision that was. It involved facing my mortality. I had just crossed the 70s threshold. How many years did I have to live? My insurance company chose to no longer offer travel insurance after I turned 70. In the same manner, I pondered my life expectancy vs. the cost of dental care. At what age is it no longer worth the expense to repair your teeth?
NEW DENTAL CARE PLAN
The answer depends quite a bit on the contents of your bank account. Health Canada tells us that one in four Canadians avoids visiting the dentist because of the expense. So, at last, our health care system is putting money into our mouths, in the form of a new Canadian Dental Care Plan (CDCP).
The new plan targets persons without private dental insurance, who were residents of Canada in 2022 for tax purposes, and whose tax returns show they have an annual family income of less than $90,000. For all the details, visit Health Canada’s website, or simply google “Canadian Dental Care Plan.”
Unlike private insurance companies, its approach is anti-ageist. Coverage was rolled out in December 2023 for persons aged 87 or older; this month for those aged 77 to 86; in February for persons aged 72 to 76; and those aged 70 to 71 in March. And so on. Persons with a valid Disability Tax Credit, and children under 18, are eligible starting in June.
What do you do to get on the plan? If you are 70 or older, you should get a letter instructing you how to apply by telephone to Service Canada. In May, an online application portal will open. Once eligibility is determined, Service Canada shares your information with Sun Life, the contracted service provider. Sun Life will send you a welcome package giving coverage details, a member’s card, and the start date of the coverage.
COVERAGE
Yes, the start date is not, I repeat NOT, the date you phone Service Canada; you will be able to “start seeing an oral health provider as early as May 2024, starting with seniors.” To be covered by the plan, your visit to the dentist’s office must be after your coverage start date provided in Sun Life’s welcome package.
Now then, exactly what will be covered? Preventive services, including teeth cleaning. Diagnostic services, such as exams and x-rays. Fillings. Root canals. Complete and partial removable dentures. Periodontal services. And oral surgeries, including extractions.
Some of these services, says Health Canada’s website, will only become available in the fall of 2024. But we don’t know yet which ones.
HOW IT WORKS
Dentists, denturists, dental hygienists, and dental specialists may choose to enroll directly with Sun Life as participating CDCP oral health providers. If they do, they can bill the CDCP directly, so you yourself will not have to seek reimbursement.
Like Quebec’s medication insurance, CDCP coverage may require a co-payment by the patient. If your annual family net income is between $80,000 and $89,999, you pay 60 percent. If it is between $70,000 and $79,999, you pay 40 per cent. If less than $70,000, no co-payment is required.
But. Here’s the detail where a devil could be hiding: “Oral health providers are encouraged to follow the CDCP established fees, which are not the same as the provincial and territorial fee guides, so their patients do not face additional charges at the point of care.”
So what’s covered are the CDCP-approved fees. I wonder… will my dentist charge just those fees, or will I be surprised by an additional charge over and above the amount covered?
Don’t get me wrong: I am grateful for the Canadian Dental Care Plan! I really want it to work.
AND WHY?
Oral health matters. It is related to a host of other health problems, respiratory disease and diabetes among them, says Health Canada. Then one last item chills my blood: “Individuals with gum diseases are two to three times more likely to have a heart attack or stroke than those with healthy gums.”
PennMedicine.org corroborates this point. “Researchers suspect that bacteria present in gum disease can travel throughout the body, triggering inflammation in the heart’s vessels and infection in heart valves.” Research continues, but “points to a link between gum disease and inflammation that can precede heart attacks, strokes, and sudden vascular events.”
My teeth almost fell out, and they’re not even false.
Excuse me, I gotta go brush my teeth. And gums! Swish, swish!
CHURCHES
United. Sunday services are 9:30 a.m. at the Trinity United Church (Cookshire), and 11 a.m. at the Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. Sunday Services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m., at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. No services in Cookshire. To find services in the deanery, check the schedule at deaneryofstfrancis.com/calendar/. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by January 22 for publication January 31.

ACTU-Rachel

Whoosh

Whoosh. Thud.
Writing these words on December 13, destined to be read on January 3rd, I try to imagine myself on the other side of the old year slipping away―whoosh―and the new one landing―thud!
In the news this morning is the compromise reached by 200 nations at the COP28 climate summit in Dubai. Countries suffering most from climate change wanted a “phaseout” of fossil fuels; countries pumping them out did not agree. Why should the 28th agreement be different from those of the previous 27 “Conferences of the Parties”?
Parties to what, you ask? The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).
This new compromise calls for countries to speed up a global shift away from fossil fuels this decade in a “just, orderly and equitable manner.” It aims to completely stop adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere by 2050. It also calls on nations to triple the production of renewable energy by 2030, and to slash emissions of methane sooner. (Methane is a greenhouse gas more potent than carbon dioxide.)
It’s all over the news. Even though oil, gas, and coal use is the primary cause of global warming, this is the first time those two little dirty words, “fossil fuels,” have been mentioned in a COP agreement.
I wonder how this agreement will read on January 3, 2024? And January 3, 2050? Promise fulfilled, or empty of meaning?
Will our skies be clear and our oceans clean? Will we earthlings have healed the earth? A hundred, a thousand years from now, will the Anthropocene Epoch have had a restorative impact on our environment overall, or a destructive one?
You may have noticed I’m speaking in the future perfect tense, asking what “will have happened.” I like to call it the tense of magical thinking. But I’m keeping an open mind. I’m trying to focus on what we can do now in our little corner of the planet.
In this new year, let’s try to keep the earth in the Goldilocks Zone, ok? Because right now, the “just right” parts of the world that sustain life seem to be fewer than even a few decades ago.
We need a “thud” and a “whoosh” like never before: A hard stop to climate destruction; a whoosh to earth rebirth. That would be a happy new year!
TYVOICES 2024
The Townships Sun’s Young Voices Awards are back – bolder, bigger and with more prize money. The 2024 project was launched this past Sunday during the Townships Sun’s 50th Anniversary Book Fest. Creative people of many ages paraded onto the stage, each carrying news of a key point.
Heading the launch were Ana Martinez and Arabella MacFish.
Martinez is a graduating high school student, a new Townships Sun Board member, and this year’s TYVoices volunteer coordinator. MacFish, her able assistant, is a 2023 TYVoices award recipient; her poem, “Secrets of Snow,” is in the current issue of the Townships Sun. (You can find it at the Cookshire IGA and the Sawyerville Dépanneur.)
Carrying the “Poetry” card was Johnny Beauvais, a 2023 TYVoices fiction award winner; their story is also in the current Townships Sun. Next, representing the “Fiction” category was a youthful Juliet Macauley-Fishman. “Nonfiction” was championed by long-time historical writer Nick Fonda.
Harry Welton, age 12, championed the “Art” category; his photo won a 2023 award and is in the current Townships Sun. Beside him, veteran photographer and writer Louise Abbott carried the “Photography” card, wrapping up the five award categories.
Three more salient points followed. High school senior Chaimber Condo noted the prizes will total at least $2000 in 2024, more than twice as much as last year, thanks to generous grants from the Townshippers’ Research & Cultural Foundation and the Sherbrooke Rotary Club.
Fiona Macauley advertised the leap year deadline for submissions: February 29, 2024.
Youth between the ages of 11 and 29 are invited to participate.
Finally, humour writer Ross Murray showed off the link where you can find more information: TownshipsSun.ca/Townships-Young-Voices, where the new guidelines are featured.
Also, tips and news can be found on Instagram @tyvoices, and YouTube @tyvoices offers writing, photography, and art ideas and strategies for participants.
Martinez said the Townships Young Voices team will be reaching out to English-speaking schools in the Townships and asking students to create TYVoices Teams, to encourage participation.
“This is your chance to win cash and get published,” said MacFish. “We are taking extra steps to make sure that the judges review the works on their merits, no matter the participants’ ages. But as before, all names and identifying information will be removed before the expert judges review the entries.”
What will the judges be looking for? “They want to see original work that has not been published elsewhere, and that tells them something about life and culture in the Eastern Townships,” explained MacFish. “How hard can that be?”
VIACTIVE
Starting January 6, the two bilingual Viactive groups reopen for business. Gérard and Denise Nault facilitate the sessions in the basement of the Saint-Rosaire Catholic Church, 4 Randboro Road, Sawyerville, on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Info: 819-889-2630.
And the Newport Viactive group, led by France Demers and Lyne Maisonneuve, is on Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m., at the Newport Municipal Hall, 1452 Route 212, Island Brook. Info: 819-889-1340.
CHURCHES
Baptist. Sunday Services, services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. No services in Cookshire. To see where services might be in the deanery, check the schedule at deaneryofstfrancis.com/calendar/. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. On January 7, no service. On January 14, 21, and 28, services are at 9:30 a.m. at the Trinity United Church (Cookshire), and at 11 a.m. at the Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by January 8 for publication January 17.

Rachel Garber

Thank You, Pierre!

A good journalist, like a good person, is one who can admit their mistakes. One who gives credit to others, even competitors. One who writes well, presents all sides of the story, really cares about getting things right. It’s a quality called integrity. It means the journalist cares more about the truth than about their ego, and shoulders their responsibility to their readers without flinching.
Pierre Hébert is just such a journalist, such a person. I’m sure you know he is the directeur général (Rédaction) of the Journal régional Le Haut-Saint-François.
And now he is retiring. I don’t want to say good-bye! But I do want to say a heartfelt «thank you,» both from my vantage point, and on behalf of all the readers of the Journal. Pierre has been the guiding star of this important newspaper for decades, so much a part of the community that we take it for granted…and maybe its editor, too.
But we should never do that. Newspapers, small and large, have been collapsing across the landscape at an alarming rate. Many communities no longer hear about their histories-in-the-making, their personalities, and their happenings because their local papers have died. Wikipedia lists 758 newspapers who have ceased publication in Canada over the years. It lists 71 in Quebec, of which 56 ceased publication since 2008.
(Yes, I know, social media. But that’s a story for another time because I want to get back to my topic at hand: What a debt of gratitude we owe Pierre Hébert!)
Pierre has judiciously guided the Journal through these stormy waters, with vibrant print and online editions. He has safeguarded and nourished this newspaper for all Haut-Saint-Franciscans. It is OUR paper, not owned by a distant «landlord.»
From my vantage point, Pierre has been a delight to work for. He’s direct, clear, kind and considerate. He’s been a dream boss.
I began this column in January 2010, after Colin Grimson retired «Colin’s Column.» Colin gave me a call, I wrote Pierre a letter of application, and «Rachel Writes» was born. It’s a column in English within a newspaper in French; a rare thing these days. Thank you, Pierre, for reaching out to the English-speaking minority in the Haut-Saint-François.
Pierre, we congratulate you on a significant career. You have made a difference for the better in our region! We―I―will miss you in these pages, and hope your years ahead will be a joyful journey.
Enjoy the holidays, Pierre! And everyone!
CHRISTMAS CONCERT
A Christmas Concert in Cookshire: The Espace cultural Cookshire-Eaton presents a trio in song, harp, and violin, by a youthful trio, Jacqueline Woodley, Juliette Duguay Patenaude, and Ryan Shao. It is on Sunday, December 17, at 3 p.m. at the Trinity United Church, 190 Principale W., Cookshire. Tickets for adults are $20; for children, free. Purchase yours at www.lepointdevente.com.
SMALL ART
The exhibition of small artworks, suitable for a really nifty gifts, continues until January 3 at the Cookshire-Eaton Art Gallery, 125 Principale West. Works by no less than 19 artists are on display. Among them are names we recognize: Robert Peloquin, Yong Souk Kim Lambert, John Ward, Denis Palmer, Louis Pierre Bougie, and Gregoire Ferland, to name a few. The Gallery is open Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m.; visits at other times are possible by appointment. Contact: galeriecookshireeaton@gmail.com.
SMALL BOOKS
A Townships Holiday Book Fest is planned for Sunday, December 10, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Amédée-Beaudoin Community Centre, 10 Samuel-Grantham, Lennoxville. Part of the Townships Sun’s 50th Anniversary celebrations, the Book Fest is a chance to discover more than 25 Townships writers and their books in English, including two from the Haut-Saint-François: Ann Rothfels, with her new children’s book, Many Lifetimes, and Denis Palmer, with his book of artwork and text, Homages.
The day will also feature a series of 15-minute readings, panels, videos, and music. Free pancakes are on from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., and tea and treats throughout the day. Partnering organizations include Townshippers’ Association, English Language Arts Network, and Quebec Writers’ Federation. Admission is free, and all are welcome. Just come!
WRITE FOR RIGHTS
Amnesty International’s Write for Rights campaign will be at the December 10th Book Fest. Stop by UUEstrie’s Write for Rights table, and be part of the world’s largest human rights event! I’ll be there.
CHURCHES
Anglican. News regarding St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 45 Principale West, Cookshire: No services. To see where services might be in the deanery, check the schedule at deaneryofstfrancis.com/calendar/. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. Upcoming Holiday services are December 10, Sunday of Joy, 9:30 a.m. at Trinity United Church (Cookshire), and 11 a.m. at Sawyerville United Church. On December 17, Sunday of Love, is at 9:30 a.m., Trinity United Church (Cookshire), at 11 a.m. at Sawyerville United Church, and at 2:30 p.m. at the Wales Home in Richmond.
On December 20 is a Blue Christmas Service at 7 p.m. at the Sawyerville United Church. On December 21 is a service at 10:30 a.m. at the Saint Francis Manor in Lennoxville, and a 3 p.m. service at Grace Village in Huntingville. On December 24 is a Christmas Eve Service with Communion at 7 p.m. at the Trinity United Church (Cookshire). (No service on December 25.)
On December 31 is a «Goodbye 2023/Hello 2024» New Year’s Service at 9:30 a.m. at the Trinity United Church (Cookshire), and at 11 a.m. at the Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. On December 24 is a bilingual service at 10:30 a.m., and a Christmas Eve service in English at 7 p.m. On December 31 is a bilingual service at 10:30 a.m. Other Sundays, services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by December 11 for publication January 3.

ACTU-Rachel

Community

I have no easy remedy to offer for the grave ills that afflict the earth, almost all inflicted by humans in this Anthropocene era. Remedies exist, but no easy ones.
So instead, I’ve narrowed the focus to our own community. Time to come together. Let us be grateful. And reach out helping hands.
CHRISTMAS MARKET
The John Henry Pope Cultural Centre is hosting its annual Christmas Market on Sunday, November 26, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 125 Principale West in Cookshire. More than 30 exhibitors! It’s an activity with heart, Coeur villageois de Cookshire-Eaton.
GIVE ART
The opportunity for holiday shopping continues at the Cookshire-Eaton Art Gallery, 125 Principale West, from December 3, 2023, to January 3, 2024. (There it is! The first mention in my column of the new year! It’s official: 2024 is on the way.)
This exhibition is of small artworks, suitable for a really nifty gift to someone you love. Works by no less than 19 artists are on display. Among them are quite a few names we recognize from previous exhibits: Robert Peloquin, Yong Souk Kim Lambert, John Ward, Denis Palmer, Louis Pierre Bougie, and Gregoire Ferland, to name a few.
The Gallery is open Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 4 p.m.; visits at other times are possible by appointment. Contact: galeriecookshireeaton@gmail.com.
GIVE BOOKS
I was at a Books & Brunch on November 12, and had a grand time. I’d never heard of cozy mysteries. They’re described as a sub-genre of crime fiction without all the R-rated content. Light, comedic, and comforting, but lots of plot twists and fun.
Too bad. Louise Carson, author of the cozy Maple Mystery series featuring dozens of cats came down with the flu at the last minute, and could not be there.
But, glory be! We had twice as much time to hear Townships humour writer par excellence, Ross Murray, talk about his new book, Smileyville. It’s a sequel to A Hole in the Ground, based in the same town, and stars a widow. She’s not too old to get into some fun and trouble.
Now then, I will not be missing the next event that is part of the Townships Sun’s 50th Anniversary celebrations. It’s a book fair planned for December 10, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Amédée-Beaudoin Community Centre.
Angela Leuck is organizing it. If it’s Angela at the helm, you know it will feature both good books and good food. In this case: pancakes! We anticipate more than two dozen Townships authors will be participating, with table space to display and sell their books. Angela also plans a series of short talks, panel discussions, videos, and music. In other words, fun. And the perfect venue to buy Townships books. In English. To give away.
If you are an author and would like more information about participating, email TownshipsSunRSVP@gmail.com.
DIRECTORY OF ARTISTS
Directory of Artists and Venues is to be created by the Haut-Saint-François Arts and Culture group. This online directory will allow organizations, schools, and individuals to more easily find the region’s cultural resources, whether to buy works, organize events, or carry out various projects related to arts and culture. Participation in this directory is free.
To appear in the directory, you must be a professional artist, according to the definition of the Canada Council for the Arts. This means an artist who has received specialized training in their field (not necessarily at an educational institution); is recognized as such by his peers (artists of the same artistic tradition); commits to devoting more time to their artistic practice, if their financial situation allows it; and has already presented or published works in public.
The Corporation de développement communautaire (CDC) of the Haut-Saint-François announced this initiative in their latest Infolettre. To appear in the directory, you need to fill out an easy online form. The Infolettre lets you click on a cute little link that takes you to said form. Trouble is, the link is unprintable – it’s alphabet soup. So I recommend this: Go to cdc-hsf.org, scroll to the bottom of the page, and under “Abonnez-vous à notre infolettre.” subscribe to the Infolettre. It requires only your name and email address. When you get the Infolettre delivered by email, you can find the form with one click. (It’s in French, but it’s easy French. It would be a shame to miss this opportunity.)
WOMEN’S VOICES
Again from the CDC is new action research that “seeks to amplify the voices of women in our community. We want to hear your experiences, understand the challenges you face, and work together to create solutions” (free translation). It involves a questionnaire and a 45-minute interview. Both women and men may respond. To do so, see the information above about the CDC’s Infolettre.
TRACKING SAMM
When he’s not in the greenhouses of the Maraîchers de l’or vert, now you can find him in the kitchen of the Cuisines collectives du Haut-Saint-François. Yes, Sammuel Tanguay is the new facilitator at the Cuisines collectives, and can be reached at ac02@cchsf.ca.
CHURCHES
United. On November 26, the first Advent service (Hope) is at 10 am. at the Sawyerville United Church. On December 3, the second Advent service (Peace) is at 9:30 a.m. at Trinity United Church in Cookshire, and at 11 a.m. at the Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. Sunday services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All services are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. News regarding St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 45 Principale West, Cookshire: “St. Peter’s Church has decided to not have any more services after Nov. 19th,” reported Jane Bishop. To see where services might be in the deanery, check the schedule at deaneryofstfrancis.com/calendar/. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by November 27 for publication December 6.

Rachel Garber

DID YOU FORGET?

If you didn’t make it to the recent conference on the military history of Bury, you can still have a small taste of the experience. John Mackley is creating a series of short videos of the event, one for each speaker. One of the first up is one by Colin Standish, talking about his grandfather’s experience in the battle of Hong Kong. More are coming. They are on YouTube/@histoireBuryhistory.
REMEMBRANCE SERVICES, 10th & 11th
War is terrible. Don’t forget.
The Royal Canadian Legion Sawyerville Branch 165 plans a series of bilingual Remembrance Day services on Friday, November 10. The first is slated for 11 a.m. at the Sawyerville cenotaph at 6 Principale North. The second is at 11:45 a.m. at the East Clifton cenotaph in front of the United Church, Route 253, between Clifton Road and Store Road. Next, at 2 p.m. at the cenotaph in front of the Cookshire Elementary School, 95 Park Avenue. The last one is at 2:45 p.m. in Island Brook, at the cenotaph in front of the Newport Municipal Hall, 1452 Route 212. All are welcome. Info: Branch 165 Past-President Jack Garneau, 819-889-2989.
The Bury Branch 48 of the Royal Canadian Legion plans two bilingual Remembrance Day services on Saturday, November 11. The first is at 10:30 a.m., at the cenotaph in front of the Scotstown Town Hall, 101 Victoria Street. In Bury, a ceremony is at 2 p.m. at The Armoury Community Centre, 563 Main Street. All are welcome. Info: Branch 48 President Richard Grey, 819-889-1024.
Remembrance Day poppies are available in poppy cans in local businesses in Bury and Cookshire-Eaton.
BOOKS & BRUNCH, 12th
Invited authors Ross Murray and Louise Carson will be featured at the second Books & Brunch offered by the Townships Sun on Sunday, November 12.
The first Books & Brunch, on October 15, featured memoir writers Mark Abley and Tanya Bellehumeur-Allatt. It got the series off to a rousing start, attracting more than 50 readers. I was there. People were really engaged! The readings by both authors sparked a lively conversation.
For the second Books & Brunch, the focus is on humour. “Everyone knows it’s good for your health,” said organizer Angela Leuck. “In these troubling times, we can use as much humour as we can find!”
Murray provides the laughs as he reads from his new book, Smileyville, the much-anticipated follow-up to his novel A Hole in the Ground. Then we’ll all be swept away into the world of whimsy with Montreal-born Louise Carson, who will read from her latest cozy mystery, The Cat Looked Back. This sixth book in her acclaimed Maples Mystery Series combines art, intrigue, gourmet food and far too many cats!
Ross Murray has published three collections of his humour and has written and directed two plays: All Together Now for Borderline Players in 2019 and Bride of Memphre this past summer.
Louise Carson is the author of 15 books. In addition to mysteries, she has also turned her hand to poetry, a lyrical novella, a historical fiction series set in 18th century Scotland, and a psychological thriller.
The Books & Brunch event begins at noon with a tasty and varied brunch. The authors will read at 1 p.m., followed by a discussion and question period. Their books will be available for purchase and author signing. The event is at the Amédée-Beaudoin Community Centre, 10 Samuel-Grantham, Lennoxville.
Admission is free, but places are limited. The Townships Sun asks participants to reserve in advance by emailing TownshipsSunRSVP@gmail.com or 819-640-1340.
Books and Brunch is a Townships Sun initiative and part of the magazine’s year-long 50th anniversary celebrations. Info: townshipssun.ca.
WILDLIFE
Say “wildlife” at this time of year, and hunting season comes to mind. But now there’s another response on the tip of my tongue, and it’s the October-November issue of the Townships Sun. On the cover is a beaver like you’ve likely never seen before, a photo by François Demers. Inside is a revealing study of biodiversity in the Townships. Also, two articles on wild habitat and how to rescue it by Jim Ferrier, a forest ranger who is been involved with several conservation groups. He offers a roundup of various organizations, and how they can help us hold on to the bits of wilderness we still have.
An exciting result of this issue, for me, is that a reader from my neck of the woods phoned to get contact information to help them conserve their back 40 acres. This Townships Sun is on the magazine rack in both the Cookshire IGA and the Lachance Dépanneur in Sawyerville.
VIACTIVE
The bilingual Sawyerville Viactive group is back in business! Gérard and Denise Nault facilitate the sessions in the basement of the Saint-Rosaire Catholic Church, 4 Randboro Road, Sawyerville, on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Info: 819-889-2630.
The Newport Viactive is also bilingual, led by France Demers and Lyne Maisonneuve on Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m., at the Newport Municipal Hall, 1452 Route 212 in Island Brook. Info: 819-889-1340.
CHURCHES
Baptist. Sunday services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All services are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. On November 19, the service is at 10 a.m. at St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 45 Principale West, Cookshire. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. Sunday services are at 10 a.m., as follows: November 12, at Sawyerville United Church, and November 19, at the Trinity United Church in Cookshire. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Jim Robinson and Susan Fowler will offer a Benefit Concert for the BBCI/Trinity United Church to help offset some of the costs following the oil spill and clean-up at the Church. Tickets are $15, and the concert is on Sunday, November 19, at 1:30 p.m., at the Trinity United Church, 190 Principale West, Cookshire.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by November 13 for publication November 22.

Rachel Garber

APPEARANCES

The title, Appar.être, is a play on the words “appearance” and “to be” in French. It’s an exhibit of luscious paintings by Amélie Lemay-Choquette at the Cookshire-Eaton Art Gallery, 125 Principale West.
“Appar.être is the ability to see oneself, to be seen and to dare to be apart… to be… no more, no less, what we really are, that is to say a unique and singular being,” explained the artist in French.
The exhibit is in two parts. Projected Worlds is an installation of five large-format paintings on glass. In/visible Encounters is an immersive installation, a painting on acetate 60 feet long by 8 feet high. It forms a giant spiral, and plays with light projected on the walls and ceilings.
Lamay-Choquette’s work is intriguing and luminous. It can be seen until November 20, Sundays from noon to 4 p.m. or by appointment with the artist, www.choquettedp.com.
HALLOWEEN AT BROOKBURY, Oct. 27
A Halloween Party is October 27 at 7 p.m., at the Brookbury Community Centre, 571 Brookbury Road, with games, judging of costumes, treats, and fun. Admission is $2, with or without a costume. Info: Brenda, at 819-884-5984.
MIGRATORY ROOTS FESTIVAL, Nov. 2 & 4
The Migratory Roots Festival organized by Literacy in Action – Estrie is coming to the Eaton Valley. Opening festivities and storytime for all ages are Thursday, November 2, 5-7 p.m. at the Eaton Corner Museum, 374 Route 253. A community art show is Saturday, November 4, at 2-3 p.m. at the Sawyerville Library, 11 Clifton Road. A community cooking session, a potluck, and a screening of the film, Fly Away Home are the same day at 4-7 p.m. at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 Cookshire Road. This 107-minute movie dramatizes the experiences of Bill Lishman who trained Canada geese to follow his ultralight aircraft, and led their migration.
The Festival features art and stories by community members and local emerging artists-in-residence. Eaton Valley artist Bethany Rothney Audit will share a story she wrote exploring her family history as an homage to her Grampie. George Kndakji, the Lennoxville Valley artist, created a visual piece full of movement, birds, and life. Annis Campione, the Massawippi Valley artist, will present a tapestry of her heritage.
Admission is free, and all are welcome, says Yolanda Weeks, the Festival’s Artistic Director. More details are on Literacy in Action’s Facebook page, or at 819-346-7009.
REMEMBRANCE SERVICES, Nov. 10 & 11
The Royal Canadian Legion Sawyerville Branch 165 plans a series of bilingual Remembrance Day services on Friday, November 10. The first is slated for 11 a.m. at the Sawyerville cenotaph at 6 Principale North. The second is at 11:45 a.m. at the East Clifton cenotaph in front of the United Church, Route 253, between Clifton Road and Store Road. Next, at 2 p.m. at the cenotaph in front of the Cookshire Elementary School, 95 Park Avenue. The last one is at 2:45 p.m. in Island Brook, at the cenotaph in front of the Newport Municipal Hall, 1452 Route 212. All are welcome. Info: Branch 165 Past-President Jack Garneau, 819-889-2989.
The Bury Branch 48 of the Royal Canadian Legion plans two bilingual Remembrance Day services on Saturday, November 11. The first is at 10:30 a.m., at the cenotaph in front of the Scotstown Town Hall, 101 Victoria Street. In Bury, a ceremony is at 2 p.m. at The Armoury Community Centre, 563 Main Street. All are welcome. Info: Branch 48 President Richard Grey, 819-889-1024.
Remembrance Day poppies are available in poppy cans in local businesses in Bury and Cookshire-Eaton.
BOOKS & BRUNCH, Nov. 12
We’ve known forever that laughing feels good, and quite a few researchers have confirmed that laughing together is good for you, too. Social laughter triggers the release of endorphins, those “feel good” hormones in the brain. They help relieve pain and trigger feelings of pleasure. Social laughter promotes social bonding between humans.
So, oddly enough, in the wake of expanding warfare in the world, and sombre Remembrance Day ceremonies, this may be the moment for a bit of laughter therapy.
Right on cue, the Townships Sun’s new Books & Brunch offers a good shot of humour! In fact, two good shots; two very funny books. Smileyville, by Ross Murray of Stanstead, is the much anticipated sequel to his novel, A Hole in the Ground. The other is by Louise Carson: The Cat Looked Back, part of her Maples Mystery series of books.
The event is on Sunday, November 12, from noon to 2 p.m. (the authors speak from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.), at the Amédée-Beaudoin Community Centre, 10 Samuel-Grantham, Lennoxville. Admission is free, but persons attending are asked to reserve in advance at TownshipsSunRSVP@gmail.com, or 819-640-1340. Donations of food, elbow grease, or dollars are welcome, but not required. This event is part of the Townships Sun’s 50th Anniversary celebrations.
COMPOST IN NEWPORT
Newport citizens who do not compost at home (are there any?) can now join the movement to reduce landfills and municipal costs. The municipality has distributed composting bins, and pickup will begin in January. Questions? Monday to Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m., call 819-560-8565 ext. 1, or email municipalite.newport@hsfqc.ca.
VIACTIVE
Viactive in Sawyerville? Renovations are uncompleted; space still not available. “Ah!! We are still waiting,” wrote the Viactive leader, Gérard Nault.
CHURCHES
Anglican. On November 5, the service is at 10 a.m. at St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 45 Principale West, Cookshire. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. Sunday services: October 29, a congregation-led hymn sing at 10 a.m., Sawyerville United Church. November 5, a Remembrance and Peace Sunday Service at 10 a.m., Trinity United Church (Cookshire). Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. Sunday services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All services are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by October 30 for publication November 8.

ACTU-Rachel

They Travelled, They Wrote

One is from the Townships, one is from Montreal. But at a tender age and in tumultuous times, both ventured into the Middle East. Both were keen observers, and both wrote journals about what was happening around them, as well as their thoughts and feelings.
Decades later, both finally called upon their meticulous notes to write books about their transformative experiences. And now they are rendezvousing at a Books & Brunch event on Sunday, October 15.
This is the first of three Townships Sun’s literary community get-togethers for book lovers, offering a chance to chat with selected authors. “If you enjoy stimulating books and great food, then Books & Brunch is for you,” said board member and organizer Angela Leuck.
One author is Mark Abley, who will be talking about his most recent book, Strange Bewildering Time: Istanbul to Kathmandu in the Last Year of the Hippie Trail (House of Anansi Press, 2023). It chronicles his three-month journey across the Middle East, combining memoir and literary travel writing. It’s a fascinating read.
Abley is an acclaimed writer and poet. He has authored eight books of nonfiction, four of poetry, and two children’s books, and many articles in the Montreal Gazette.
The other author is Tanya Bellehumeur-Allatt, whose family took her to Israel and Lebanon for a year. Her father was a United Nations peacekeeper during a civil war, a wave of terrorism, the murder of thousands of Palestinians, and Israel’s invasion of Lebanon. Peacekeeper’s Daughter: A Middle East Memoir (Thistledown, 2021) tells her story in hair-raising detail, interweaving family dynamics, from her perspective as a 12-year-old, and “the shattering effects of violence and war.”
Long-time North Hatley resident, Bellehumeur-Allatt has also recently published a book of poetry, Chaos Theories of Goodness (Shoreline Press, 2022).
Part of the Townships Sun’s year-long 50th anniversary celebration, Books & Brunch is 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Lennoxville; Abley and Bellehumeur-Allatt will speak between 12:30 and 1:30 p.m. Entrance is free, but space is limited. Participants are asked to reserve in advance: TownshipsSunRSVP@gmail.com or 819-640-1340.
VIACTIVE
Viactive on Wednesdays at 1:30 p.m. continues at the Newport Municipal Hall, 1452 Route 212 in Island Brook. France Demers and Lyne Maisonneuve lead the weekly bilingual sessions. Info: 819-889-1340.
But alas! the start of the Viactive program in Sawyerville is still delayed due to repair work in the basement of the Sawyerville Catholic Church.
BROOKBURY POTLUCK, 14th
A potluck supper and silent auction are at the Brookbury Community Centre on October 14, at 5 p.m. Address: 571 Brookbury Road, Bury. Bring something for the food table and an item to put in the silent auction. No admission charge. Info: Brenda, at 819-884-5984.
WARTIME TALKS, BANQUET, 21st
Saturday, October 21, is a military history conference and wartime-style banquet organized by the Bury Historical and Heritage Society. Surrounded by images, texts and artefacts related to Bury’s military tradition from 1866 onwards, speakers will discuss these events to help today’s generations understand and appreciate the challenges and sacrifices that were made. The displays and talks will recall the life and times of World War II, and the banquet will give a taste of its flavours during shortages and rationing.
The event is at the Armoury Community Center, 563 Main St., Bury, from 1 to 7 p.m. The banquet is at 5 p.m. Tickets are on sale now, $20 for the conference and banquet; $15 for members of the Bury Historical and Heritage Society. You may bring your own wine. Only 125 places are available, so advance purchase is highly recommended. Contact: edwardwpedersen@gmail.com or 819-872-3400 (leave a message).
HALLOWEEN AT BROOKBURY, 27th
A Halloween Party is planned for October 27 at 7 p.m., at the Brookbury Community Centre, 571 Brookbury Road. There will be games, judging of costumes, treats, and lots of fun. Admission is $2, with or without a costume. This is the last Brookbury event planned for the season. Info: Brenda, at 819-884-5984.
HEADS UP!
It’s the time of year when you look up to track the leaves changing colour and the geese flying south. Now heads up for another sort of migration, the Migratory Roots Festival organized by Literacy in Action – Estrie. The festivities are touching down in the Lennoxville Valley in late October, Eaton Valley in early November, and the Massawippi Valley in mid-November.
For the Eaton Valley area, LIA is bringing us three special events in three different venues. On Thursday, November 2, at 5-7 p.m. are opening festivities and storytime for all ages at the Eaton Corner Museum, 374 Route 253. On Saturday, November 4, at 2-3 p.m. is a community art show at the Sawyerville Library, 11 Clifton Road. The same day at 4-7 p.m. are a community cooking session, a potluck, and a screening of the film, Fly Away Home.
This 107-minute movie dramatizes the real experiences of Bill Lishman. In 1986 he started training Canada geese to follow his ultralight aircraft, and was able to lead their migration in 1993 through his program, “Operation Migration.”
This is a chance to “listen, learn and lean into the migratory stories of the English-speaking communities,” says the LIA Facebook page. Beth Rothney Audit is the artist in residence for the Eaton Valley events. They are free of charge, and all are welcome. Info: connect@lia-estrie.org, or 819-346-7009.
CHURCHES
United. Sunday services: October 15 at 10 a.m., Trinity United Church (Cookshire). October 22, no service. October 29, a congregation-led hymn sing at 10 a.m., Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. Sunday services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All services are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. On October 15, the service is at 10 a.m. at St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 45 Principale West, Cookshire. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by October 16 for publication October 25.

ACTU-Rachel

YOUNG VOICES

Are you young? Do you enjoy taking photos? Creating artwork? Writing stories, poetry, or non-fiction? If so, a new Townships Young Voices Awards project is coming for you. Deadline: February 29, 2024. Courtesy of the Townships Sun, and supported by the Townshippers’ Research & Cultural Foundation.
This is a chance to be creative, to have your creativity recognized and appreciated, and to get published in the Townships’ own community/cultural magazine in English. The 2023 Young Voices recognized 19 young creatives with cash prizes, and publishing their work in the Townships Sun over the following months.
For example, in the September issue is a gripping story, “Lockdown,” by Megan Foster, age 12. A poem, “Child,” is by Ruohan Wallis, age 17, who keeps on sending contributions for publication after her award-winning article, “Waste and You,” was published in May. It compares waste disposal in Canada and China. Her co-author, Jenny Yin, lives in China.
By the way, this issue is on the magazine stands in the Cookshire IGA and the Lachance Dépanneur for the next two days. You’ll spot the stunning artwork on the cover, “Shadow Play,” by artist Xania Keane, a Haut-Saint-Franciscan who is also youngish.
Another Townships Young Voices winner has work published in the upcoming October-November issue of the Townships Sun. “Forest of Dendra” is a whimsical sculpture of wildlife and magical creatures hiding in a tree. It’s creator, Andra Denver Quilliams, won first prize in the category of art. This issue should be in your mailbox or on the stands by October 1st. You’ll be confronted by a masterful beaver on the cover.
50 YEARS
Here are some pretty impressive numbers. Total pages: 14,135, of which 10,659 were in tabloid format, and 3,476 in magazine format. That’s how many pages were in 525 issues of the Townships Sun, almost 50 years worth. Thanks to John Mackley’s scanning back issues over the past year (it may have felt like 50 years!), these are now accessible, free, online at the Bibliothèque et archives nationales du Québec (BAnQ).
The online archives were launched publicly last Friday, and can be easily accessed and searched. Just look for BAnQ, click on Recherche (the magnifying glass), and type “Townships Sun.” That lets you look for particular topics, contributors, or articles in the magazine. For example, look up “Bernard Epps.” You’ll found a slew of writings and artwork about our very own Haut-Saint-François. He was our neighbour, after all.
BROOKBURY POTLUCK
Get cooking: A potluck supper and silent auction are planned for the Brookbury Community Centre on October 14, at 5 p.m. Address: 571 Brookbury Road, Bury. Bring something to add to the food table and an item to put in the silent auction. No admission charge. Info: Brenda, at 819-884-5984.
HALLOWEEN AT BROOKBURY
A Halloween Party is planned for October 27 at 7 p.m., at the Brookbury Community Centre, 571 Brookbury Road. There will be games, judging of costumes, treats, and lots of fun. Admission is $2, with or without a costume. This is the last Brookbury event planned for the season. Info: Brenda, at 819-884-5984.
WARTIME TALKS, BANQUET
Building on the extensive military history exhibit last March, the Bury Historical and Heritage Society has organized a conference and a wartime-style banquet for Saturday, October 21.
Surrounded by images, texts and artefacts related to Bury’s military tradition from 1866 onwards, speakers will discuss these events to help today’s generations understand and appreciate the challenges and sacrifices that have been made. What was life like at the time? How did women cope with the absence or loss of men in their families? Who were some of these men? What did they look like? The banquet will recall the tastes and flavours of World War II times.
The event is at the Armoury Community Center, 563 Main St., Bury, from 1 to 7 p.m. The banquet is at 5 p.m.
Tickets are on sale now, $20 for the conference and banquet; $15 for members of the Bury Historical and Heritage Society. You may bring your own wine. Only 125 places are available, so advance purchase is highly recommended. Contact: edwardwpedersen@gmail.com or 819-872-3400 (leave a message).
EATON CORNER
Visits to the Eaton Corner Museum end October 1st for the 2023 season. The 2024 season is to open on the June 24th holiday weekend. For information or questions, call the Museum at 819-875-5256 and leave a message. “Thank you to those who visited the Eaton Corner Museum during the 2023 season,” says Sharon Moore.
NATURE TRILOGY
Last chance to see the Trilogia Natura exhibition with works by Denis Palmer of Randboro, George Foster of Way’s Mills, and Louise Marois of Sherbrooke. The exhibit at the Cookshire-Eaton Art Gallery, 125 Prinicipale St., Cookshire, ends October 9. Opening hours are from noon to 4 p.m., Wednesday through Sunday, or by appointment by contacting galeriecookshireeaton@gmail.com.
Also, an exhibit by painter Diane Dugal until October 9: “Et si tu osais laisser ta trace…” And if you dared to leave your mark…
NO YOGA THIS FALL
Sawyerville Yoga instructor Myrna MacDonald writes, “Sadly, I have decided not to hold the fall session of Yoga. I had an incident with my hip again, and feel it is wise not to tempt fate. Hopefully, we can resume next year. Please take care. Namasté.”
CHURCHES
Baptist. Sunday services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All services are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. On October 1st, the service is at 10 a.m. at St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 45 Principale West, Cookshire. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. Sunday services: October 1st at 10 a.m., Trinity United Church (Cookshire). October 8 at 10 a.m. Thanksgiving service with communion, Sawyerville United Church. October 15 at 10 a.m., Trinity United Church (Cookshire). Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by October 2 for October 11.

Rachel Garber

KING PINS

Personally, as someone of distinctly non-English extraction, I’ve never been into monarchs, except the butterfly variety. As an institution, that is. Just like I’m not big on billionaires and celebrities, as the quasi-institution they have become. Nothing personal. Some very nice people are stars. It’s just painful to see so few people hogging so much wealth while so many people starve. One could call it an obscenity. (I stop here; this is a family newspaper.)
But I do know monarchs come in both genders, as in queens and kings.
This is apparently not so well known to the folks at the Canadian Heraldic Authority who, on the occasion of King Charles III’s coronation, created hundreds of lapel pins to be distributed to volunteers across Canada.
An information card accompanies the three-cm high pin. It says, “At the coronation of King Charles III, the first monarch in seven decades, the Canadian Heraldic Authority created this Canadian emblem that displays the Royal Seal (CRIII) in the centre and the crown of the monarch at the top.”
Oh my. The “first monarch in seven decades”? (What was Queen Elizabeth, chopped liver?)
It goes on. “Thirteen triangles represent the provinces and territories of Canada and the circular arrangement embodies inclusion, equity and cycles of nature. Green represents the environment, an important cause for Her Majesty, and symbolizes hope and growth.”
Whiplash. “Her Majesty”? (Who is King Charles III, really?)
Get your story straight, copywriters!
I was surprised to be among the volunteers nominated by their own community members for recognition. It was a lovely afternoon at Uplands. The Honourable Marie-Claude Bibeau has a lovely presence, a firm handshake, and a flowing signature. But I am grateful, most of all, to be part of this community, a little bit wild and wholly wonderful. And grateful for all our volunteers!
King pin or not.
PARTY SAWYERVILLE, Sept. 15-16
It’s old fashioned fun: Loisirs Sawyerville’s Neighbours’ Party Party d’voisins de Sawyerville is coming right up this Friday and Saturday at the Sawyerville Skating Rink, Park of La Station.
Both days feature activities for children, with bouncy castles from 4 to 7 p.m., and music all evening. On Friday, DEEJAY-T puts on music from 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., and Saturday’s band is Double or Nothing from 1 to 4 p.m., then Old School Country from 7 to 10 p.m. and then, until 1 a.m., 19 Stone with a tribute to ACDC.
Saturday the party begins at 10 a.m. with a silent auction, bingo with a $300 jackpot, and games: a Cornhole Toss, Ladderball, and more. Both days feature 50-50 draws and a bar and canteen. Full details are on Loisirs Sawyerville’s bilingual Facebook page.
VIACTIVE, Sept. 20
Step lively! The Viactive group begins again on Wednesday, September 20, at 1:30 p.m. at the Newport Municipal Hall at 1452 Route 212 in Island Brook. France Demers and Lyne Maisonneuve lead the weekly bilingual sessions. Info: 819-889-1340.
The bilingual Viactive program in Sawyerville on Wednesday mornings is off to a slower start because of delayed repair work on the Sawyerville Catholic Church at 4 Randboro Road. Gerard Nault, who leads the group with Denise Nault, reported this group should resume near the beginning of October.
BROOKBURY, Sept. 23
The community garage sale at Brookbury Hall on September 23, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. is a go! All tables are rented; just show up to browse and buy, at 571 Brookbury Road, Bury.
MILITARY HISTORY, BANQUET, Oct. 21
Tickets are available now for a Conference on the Military History of Bury and its surroundings, followed by a Wartime-style Banquet, on Saturday. The October 21st conference features images, texts, and artefacts related to Bury’s military tradition starting in 1866. These describe the life and times of wartime, how women coped with the absence or loss of men in their families, and show images of many who left their homes to respond to the call for help.
Starting at 1 p.m., various speakers will “discuss these events to help today’s generations understand and appreciate the challenges and sacrifices that were made,” wrote Edward Pederson, one of the event organizers. A banquet that recalls the tastes and flavours of World War II will be served at 5 p.m. The event is at the Armoury Community Center, 563 Main St., Bury.
Tickets are $20 for the conference and banquet, or $15 for members of the Bury Historical and Heritage Society, which organized the event. “Advance purchase of tickets is highly recommended as only 125 places are available. You may bring your own wine,” said Pedersen. To get your tickets, contact edwardpedersen@gmail.com, or 819-872-3400.
HOME CHILDREN
Last call: The Brampton family’s photos and artefacts documenting stories of British Home Children are on exhibit at the Eaton Corner Museum until the end of September. Opening hours are on Saturday and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Eaton Corner Museum is located at 374 Route 253, Cookshire-Eaton. Admission charged. Info: eatoncorner59@gmail.com, or call Sharon at 819-837-2643.
NATURE TRILOGY
The Trilogia Natura exhibition with works by Denis Palmer of Randboro, George Foster of Way’s Mills, and Louise Marois of Sherbrooke continues at the Cookshire-Eaton Art Gallery, 125 Prinicipale St., Cookshire, until October 9. Opening hours are from noon to 4 p.m., Wednesday through Sunday, or by appointment by contacting galeriecookshireeaton@gmail.com.
CHURCHES
Anglican. On September 17, the service is at 10 a.m. at St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 45 Principale West, Cookshire. No service is planned for September 24. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. Sunday services are at 9:30 a.m. at the Trinity United Church (Cookshire), and 11 a.m. at the Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. Sunday services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All services are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by September 18 for September 27.

ACTU-Rachel

WILD

What does childhood in the Townships have in common with wildlife? Quite a bit, I’m beginning to think.
I’m considering this question as I do two things simultaneously for the Townships Sun: launching the September issue into the public — theme: childhood—and recruiting articles, art and photos for the October/November issue—theme: wildlife.
Childhood and wildlife are both evocative and endangered. “Remember when…?” and our eyes get that faraway look as we recall bygone days. Shanna Bernier writes about “space to wander” in relative safety as a child in the Townships. Elizabeth Paulette-Coughlin writes about the poetry of “the language of birds,” and the owl as her “familiar.” The Freedom, the spiritual, the loving aspects of the untamed within us and in nature.
Then there’s the dark side of wildness, in the human condition as well as in nature. War. Rage. Neglect. Megan Foster, age 12, writes a chilling short story, “Lockdown.” Rachel Lambie, curator of the Lac-Brome Museum, writes about the British Home Children brought to the Eastern Townships, a story that is equal parts tragedy and hope. (Learn more at the Eaton Corner Museum.)
Heating up and overloaded by pollution and exploitation, nature convulses. Wildfires, hurricanes, and other extreme events surround us. In this melee, what of wildlife? As their—and our—habitat is destroyed, so are they. “Half of earth’s species could go extinct by 2050,” reads one headline. Whether it’s bees, three-toed salamanders, or cougars, study after study point a finger at human greed and climate change as the root cause of their demise.
Yet, as Wendell Berry writes, “I come into the peace of wild things.”
Nature. Our survival depends on it. There is hope. Look at the conservation movement in the Townships and beyond. Look at our collective, albeit slow, shift away from fossil fuels.
These are difficult times. How to recognize both the tragedy and the hope in childhood and wildlife? The editor of the Townships Sun magazine is losing sleep over this!
NATURE TRILOGY
Or more poetically, Trilogia Natura. It’s an exhibition bringing together the work of three established artists who share an affinity with the natural world. First is Louise Marois from Sherbrooke, an artist, graphic designer, and poet. The exhibit invitation shows a delicate rendering of a ragged mushroom, in graphite on paper. Preview her work on her website, studiotbone.com.
Next is Denis Palmer of Randboro, well known for his luminous watercolour paintings, now working more darkly in printmaking; the invitation shows a wood-cut of a forest scene on black paper.
Rounding out the trilogy is sculptor George Foster of Way’s Mills, famous for his giant bronze bugs and insects, rendered with relentless intricacy.
These very different ways of seeing and honouring our shared natural world are fascinating in their unique, evocative gazes. The exhibition is at the Cookshire-Eaton Art Gallery, 125 Prinicipale St., Cookshire, until October 9. Opening hours are from noon to 4 p.m., Wednesday through Sunday, or by appointment by contacting galeriecookshireeaton@gmail.com.
TOWNSHIPPERS’ FESTIVAL, Sept. 9
Townshippers’ Festival is planned for the Stone Circle in Stanstead on Saturday, September 9, from noon to 11 p.m., hosted by PACE, Phelps Helps, and the Haskell Library. A supper of poutine, fries and sausages is slated for 4:30 p.m., with beer from the Coaticook Microbrasserie. Music in the afternoon is by Mike Goudreau, and in the evening by The Midnight Groove. Fireworks are at 8:30 p.m. Kiosks of artisans, community groups and more will be there, too.
Townshippers’ Association is partnering with Stanstead’s Septemberfest, put on by the Stanstead Recreational Association. For information, contact Paige Frost, Townshippers’ Association’s Festival and Outreach Coordinator at 819-566-5717 or ta@townshippers.org.
CHURCH TOUR, Sept. 10
A “Portes ouvertes” tour of churches throughout the Haut-Saint-François has been organized by the Conseil du patrimoine religieux du Québec for Sunday, September 10. Participating in the Religious Heritage tour is the Trinity United Church in Cookshire. It will be open from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. for Guided Tours and Discovering the Voices of the Past of Cookshire-Eaton.
Also participating is the Canterbury Center at 1095 Route 214, Canterbury, hosting an Open House from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Formerly the Christ Church Canterbury, the Centre has mounted an exhibit of historical objects from the church. At noon, the Canterbury Committee of the Bury Historical and Heritage Society will install a commemorative plaque for Irwin and Muriel Hammond Watson, and will unveil the Honour Roll of 1916, listing veterans from St. Alban’s Church in Scotstown and Christ Church Canterbury. The document has been in the Christ Church since 1916, and was recently restored by John Mackley. At 1 p.m., lunch will be served.
BROOKBURY, Sept. 23
A community garage sale is planned for Brookbury Hall on September 23, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. To reserve a large table (fee $10) and sell your wares, contact Brenda Bailey, 819-884-5984.
HOME CHILDREN
The Brampton family’s photos and artefacts documenting stories of British Home Children are on exhibit at the Eaton Corner Museum until the end of September. Opening hours for this exhibit in the Academy building, as well as the main exhibit, are on Saturday and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Eaton Corner Museum is located at 374 Route 253, Cookshire-Eaton. Admission charged. Info: eatoncorner59@gmail.com, or call Sharon at 819-837-2643.
CHURCHES
United. Sunday services are at 9:30 a.m. at the Trinity United Church (Cookshire), and 11 a.m. at the Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. Sunday services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All services are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. On September 3, the service is at 10 a.m. at St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 45 Principale West, Cookshire. For information about the September 10th service, visit deaneryofstfrancis.com and click on the “Calendar” link. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by September 4 for September 13.

ACTU-Rachel

HOME CHILDREN

“From 1869 to 1932, more than 100,000 children between the ages of four and 18 were brought to Canada through the British Home Child Program.”
That’s how Rachel Lambie begins her article to be published in the September issue of the Townships Sun. The story is based on a Home Children exhibit currently at the Lac-Brome Museum, where Lambie is curator. The exhibit highlights the role of the Knowlton Distributing Home, with interpretive panels telling the stories of selected children.
The other Townships distributing home was in Sherbrooke, the Gibbs Home for Waifs and Strays. (Many other poverty-stricken children went to foster homes in Ontario or central Canada.)
But there’s more to this story, and our Eaton Corner Museum, in its quiet manner, is telling another important chapter of it in its own display.
In 2009, explained Sharon Moore, the Bampton family “were needing to downsize, so we received the panels with information and a trunk that would have come to Canada with a Home Boy. Since then, we’ve been given two more trunks, books and other documents.”
Sharon Moore is the Eaton Corner Museum’s vice-president. She said Sarge and Pauline Bampton family were the Quebec representatives for the British Home Children Advocacy & Research Association, now known as Home Children Canada. This organization was set up to help former Home Children and their families locate their personal documents, such as their birth certificate, and to connect with each other and with long-lost family members.
“The bulk of the documents from the Brampton’s were deposited with the ETRC [Eastern Townships Resource Centre],” Sharon wrote in an email. The current Home Children exhibit offers much to see, including three trunks that held all the possessions of three different children who probably ended up in the Haut-Saint-François. As part of the complete Museum visit, it is in the Academy building at the Eaton Corner Museum, 374 Route 253, Cookshire-Eaton.
The August opening hours are Thursday to Sunday, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and the September hours are weekends only. Admission charged. Info: eatoncorner59@gmail.com, or call Sharon at 819-837-2643.
The touching story of one Home Boy is told in an article by Heather Darch on 100objects.qahn.org, where the trunk containing his possessions is Object No. 48. His name was Frederick Erasmus Charles Williams. “He was born in Farnham, Kent, England, on February 19, 1897,” she wrote. “He was not an orphan when he boarded the SS Victorian at the age of 15, along with 23 other boys. Everything he owned was packed into a lacquered pine box painted with a red cross on all four sides and stencilled with his final destination, the Gibbs Home.”
Frederick fought in World War I, and died of the Spanish Influenza at the age of 21.
COOKSHIRE PARK, Aug. 27
An outdoor concert by the SaxoLogie Ensemble, a quartet of saxaphones: soprano (Louis-Philippe Bonin), alto (Stéphane Jackson), tenor (Clio Theodoridis), and baritone (Jean-Philippe Godard): Their repertoire of chamber music ranges from baroque to modern, including works by Glass, Piazzola, and Browning. It’s in the Parc des Braves, 85 avenue du Parc, in the heart of Cookshire on Sunday, August 27, at 5 p.m. Free of charge, open to all.
TOWNSHIPPERS’ FESTIVAL, Sept. 9
Townshippers’ Day is back!
After three years off due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Townshippers’ Association has just announced its annual fall event, Townshippers’ Festival, is planned for Saturday, September 9. The festival will be at the Stone Circle in Stanstead, as a feature of Stanstead’s Septemberfest. In partnership with the Stanstead Recreational Association, the festival will include all of the usual attractions music, food, and kiosks for artisans and community groups, family activities, and more.
Septemberfest is an annual event organized by the Stanstead Recreational Association, a not-for-profit group that organizes activities for people of all ages in Stanstead. This popular festival includes music, food and drinks, and activities for children and families. This year, Townshippers’ Association will add some of the ever-popular elements of the Townshippers’ Festival into the mix, including artisan kiosks and kiosks from community and governmental organizations.
Uniquely, the 2023 event combines two popular fall festivals. “This event will offer Townshippers from across the region―and beyond―a chance to discover the municipality of Stanstead, a community that we feel exemplifies the core values of community involvement and inclusion that we, as Townshippers, share. We hope to see you there!” wrote Townshippers’ Association’s President, Donald Warnholtz.
Activities begin at noon and continue until 11 p.m., hosted by PACE, Phelps Helps, and the Haskell Library. A supper of poutine, fries and sausages is slated for 4:30 p.m., with beer from the Coaticook Microbrasserie. Music in the afternoon is by Mike Goudreau, and in the evening by The Midnight Groove. Fireworks are at 8:30 p.m.
For information, contact Paige Frost, Townshippers’ Association’s Festival and Outreach Coordinator at 819-566-5717 or ta@townshippers.org.
BROOKBURY, Sept. 23
A community garage sale is planned for Brookbury Hall on September 23, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. To reserve a large table (fee $10) and sell your wares, contact Brenda Bailey, 819-884-5984.
CHURCHES
Baptist. In-person Sunday services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All services are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. All services in August are at 10 a.m., in varying locations. On August 20, the service is at St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 45 Principale West, Cookshire. On August 27, the service is at St. John’s Anglican Church, 436 Batley Road, Brookbury. For details, visit deaneryofstfrancis.com and click on the “Calendar” link. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. All services in August are at 10:30 a.m., in varying locations. On August 20 will be a service at Trinity United Church in Cookshire. On August 27 the service is to be at the Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by August 21 for August 30.

Rachel Garber

MANY LIFETIMES

Just launched is an enchanting story and picture book by Ann Rothfels, entitled Many Lifetimes. Richly illustrated with Rothfels’ own watercolours, it offers an imaginative approach to the age-old question, “Who am I?” by asking in turn, “Who could I be?”
“The story is about a magical seed that becomes one flower after another, experimenting with different life forms,” she said. Using flower imagery, the story of life unfolding promises to enchant both children and adults.
“I’m seeing it as a good story for parents to read to young children,” said Rothfels. “It’s for all ages, really. I’m thinking of The Little Prince. It’s a similar kind of story. It can be read on one level as a child, and as an adult, it’s a much richer story.”
Many of us know Ann Rothfels as the librarian of the little Sawyerville Library and a retired kindergarten teacher. She has raised a family, and in her Eaton Corner home, enjoys fabric creations and watercolour meditations. This is her first book.
Many Lifetimes is a hard-covered book, 8.5 by 11 inches, with 23 pages. It is published by Shoreline Press, headquartered in Coaticook. To buy the book at $20, contact 819-875-5428.
DISASTERS
Remember that ancient curse, “May you live in interesting times”? We do live in interesting times, we always do, because they are ours. The human race has disasters galore!
I wonder, which Townships disaster would you nominate as the most interesting? The July-August Townships Sun explores the question. Top of mind is the Lac Mégantic train explosion 10 years ago. The cover shows a striking photo by Corey Bellam; inside is an insightful story by Marie Moliner.
What about the “paradigm shifting” St. Francis River flood of 1982? Nick Fonda looks at it. More recently, many of us will recall the 1998 Ice Storm of the Century. The Townships Sun offers two memoirs of that experience.
Not to mention the Great Fire in Lennoxville in 1874. Scott Verity Stevenson looks further back to the “Year Without a Summer” in 1816, its surprising cause, and its lasting effects. Yours truly looks way, way back at the massive earthquake of 1663, and the bizarre evidence it left in the depths of Lake Memphremagog, described in the Townships Sun in 1988.
The July-August issue is on the magazine racks in both the Cookshire IGA and the Lachance Dépanneur in Sawyerville. Better yet, you can subscribe at townshipssun.ca, or by calling 819-566-7424.
COOKSHIRE ART
On now at the Cookshire-Eaton Art Gallery is an exhibit that brings together three 20th century artists who worked together in an engraving studio: Master printmaker François-Xavier Marange (1948-2012) from Paris; Louis-Pierre Bougie, an accomplished engraver from Quebec, and Martin Müller-Reinhart, from Switzerland. The exhibit continues until August 20, and the gallery is open Wednesdays to Sundays, from noon to 5 p.m., at 125 Principale W., Cookshire.
CLOUTIER POND, Aug. 4+
Sérénité Sonore offers a new approach to enjoying the stars in our Dark Sky Reserve. Beside the Cloutier Pond at 675 Grenier Road in Cookshire-Eaton, lie back in a hammock-chair under the night sky, while enjoying a concert of harp music. Organized by the Espace culturel Cookshire-Eaton, a series of eight concerts are open for small groups of up to 15 persons. The dates to choose from are August 4, 11, 12, and 18; and September 1st, from 9 to 10 p.m. By reservation only. Email: galeriecookshireeaton@gmail.com. Website: galeriedartcookshireeaton.com.
CANTERBURY, Aug. 5
The Canterbury Centre hosts a Community Potluck Supper on Saturday, August 5, from 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. What’s on the menu? Corn on the cob, salads, meats, seafood, and homemade delicacies and desserts. Music! Door prizes! All are welcome; please RSVP to Candace Coleman at 819-657-4661. The Canterbury Centre is located at 1095 Route 214, Canterbury.
COOKSHIRE FAIR, Aug. 17+
The website of the Cookshire Fair from August 17 to 20 is now chock full of up-to-date information. It’s at expocookshire.com.
COOKSHIRE PARK, Aug. 27
An outdoor concert by the SaxoLogie Ensemble, a quartet of saxaphones: soprano (Louis-Philippe Bonin), alto (Stéphane Jackson), tenor (Clio Theodoridis), and baritone (Jean-Philippe Godard): Their repertoire of chamber music ranges from baroque to modern, including works by Glass, Piazzola, and Browning. It’s in the Parc des Braves, 85 avenue du Parc, in the heart of Cookshire on Sunday, August 27, at 5 p.m. Free of charge, open to all.
EATON CORNER MUSEUM
At the Eaton Corner Museum, 374 Route 253, Cookshire-Eaton, the August opening hours are Thursday to Sunday, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission charged. Info: eatoncorner59@gmail.com, or call Sharon at 819-837-2643.
MURMURING IMAGES
Outdoor images projected onto the walls of Victoria Hall and other buildings take you back to the beginnings of the Eaton Township. Beginning at nightfall, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays. Murmures du Canton, at the Parc des Braves, 85 Principale West, Cookshire.
BROOKBURY, Sept. 23
At Brookbury Hall is planned a community garage sale on September 23, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. To reserve a large table (fee $10) and sell your wares, contact Brenda Bailey, 819-884-5984.
CHURCHES
Anglican. All services in August are at 10 a.m., in varying locations. On August 6, the service is at St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 45 Principale West, Cookshire. On August 13, the service is at St. John’s Anglican Church, 436 Batley Road, Brookbury. For details, visit deaneryofstfrancis.com and click on the “Calendar” link. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. All services in August are at 10:30 a.m., in varying locations. On August 6 will be a service at Trinity United Church in Cookshire. On August 13 the service is to be at the Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. In-person Sunday services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All services are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by August 7 for August 16.

Rachel Garber

USE IT

LITTLE LIBRARIES
Have you visited your little local library recently? These small outposts of culture and literacy are some of the “use it or lose it” assets we don’t know we’ve got till they’re gone. You know, like those well hidden brochures in English. Two of the smallest libraries?
In Cookshire, a small but inviting space offers books in English for adults, hidden in the rear room of the Biblio Municipal, in the lower level of the Manoir Eau-Vive, at 210 rue Principale East. Library volunteer Erna Amyot invites readers to drop by on Thursdays from 2 to 4 p.m. “We have a large variety of books ready for your summer reading. Our volunteer librarians are looking forward to seeing you.”
In Sawyerville, Ann Rothfels welcomes visitors in a small space that is chock full of books, in a super-organized way. Enter by the back door of the erstwhile town hall at 11A Clifton Road, on Wednesdays between 7 and 8:30 p.m., and Saturdays from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. She offers a rotating variety of books for both adults and children, in both English and French. Ask about this summer’s drawing contest for children of all ages. A book about bugs and insects, in French, is the prize.
COOKSHIRE FAIR
Heads up: the Cookshire Fair is planned for August 17-20.
EATON CORNER MUSEUM
At the Eaton Corner Museum, 374 Route 253, Cookshire-Eaton, the July-August opening hours are Thursday to Sunday, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission charged. Info: eatoncorner59@gmail.com, or call Sharon at 819-837-2643.
MURMURING IMAGES
Outdoor images projected onto the walls of Victoria Hall and other buildings take you back to the beginnings of the Eaton Township. Beginning at nightfall, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays. Murmures du Canton, at the Parc des Braves, 85 Principale West, Cookshire.
COOKSHIRE CONCERTS, July 23+
Outdoors in the Parc des Braves at 85 avenue du Parc in the heart of Cookshire on Sundays at 5 p.m. are two more concerts free of charge, open to all.
July 23: The musicians are five: The DeVito Brass Quintet (Robin Doyon and Frédéric Gagnon on trumpets, Gabriel Gauthier-Beaudoin on horn, Martin Ringuette on trombone, and Jean-Philippe Dutil on tuba). Expect an eclectic and entertaining journey from baroque to jazz, including film music.
August 27: The SaxoLogie Ensemble is a quartet of saxaphones: soprano (Louis-Philippe Bonin), alto (Stéphane Jackson), tenor (Clio Theodoridis), and baritone (Jean-Philippe Godard). Their repertoire of chamber music promises to amaze, from baroque to modern, including works by Glass, Piazzola, and Browning.
COOKSHIRE SERENITY, July 7+
Sérénité Sonore offers a new approach to enjoying the stars in our Dark Sky Reserve. Beside the Cloutier Pond, lie back in a hammock-chair under the night sky, while enjoying a concert of harp music. Breathe.
This relaxing experience is offered by Sérénité Sonore’s founder, Annabelle Renzo, and organized by the Espace culturel Cookshire-Eaton. A series of eight concerts are open for small groups of up to 15 persons. On Friday evenings and the week of the Persiades, the dates to choose from are July 7, 14, and 28; August 4, 11, 12, and 18; and September 1st, from 9 to 10 p.m. (“Doors” open at 8:30 p.m.). The location is the Cloutier Pond, 675 Grenier Road, Cookshire-Eaton. The fee is $60 plus taxes, or $73.22. Per concert. Accessible for persons with limited mobility. By reservation only. Email: galeriecookshireeaton@gmail.com. Website: galeriedartcookshireeaton.com.
CARD PARTIES, July 11&25
At Brookbury Hall: Card parties on Tuesdays, July 11 and 25, at 1:30 p.m. For a seat at the card and lunch tables, the fee is $8/person. The Hall’s new address is 571 Brookbury Road (aka Route 255). Info: Brenda Bailey, 819-884-5984.
SALES, July 29&30; Sept.23
At the Canterbury Center, a Flea Market/Marché aux puces and Farmers’ Market are planned for Saturday and Sunday, July 29 and 30. The organizers seek donations of small items and antiques. To arrange to drop off donations, or to have them picked up if your mobility is reduced, call 819-872-3400. The Canterbury Center is located at 1095 Route 214, Canterbury.
At Brookbury Hall is planned a community garage sale on September 23, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. To reserve a large table (fee $10) and sell your wares, contact Brenda Bailey, 819-884-5984.
POTLUCK, Aug. 5
The Canterbury Center hosts a Community Potluck Supper on Saturday, August 5, starting at 4:30 p.m. Ed Pederson says, “Everyone is welcome. Candy Coleman is organizing the menu, so she will call you if you participated in 2019. If you are new to Canterbury Cuisine, you can call her at 819-657-4661.” The Canterbury Center is located at 1095 Route 214, Canterbury.
CHURCHES
United. All services in July are at 10:30 a.m., in varying locations. On July 9 will be a service at Trinity United Church in Cookshire. On July 16 the service is to be at the East Clifton United Church, 207 Route 253, Saint-Isidore-de-Clifton. On July 23, at the Trinity United Church in Cookshire, is a service that includes a baptism celebration. And on July 30, the service is at the Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. In-person Sunday services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All services are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. All services in July are at 10 a.m., in varying locations. On July 9 and 16, the services are at St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 45 Principale West, Cookshire, and on the 9th, it includes the Fraser Family Reunion. On July 23, the service is to be at St. John’s Anglican Church, 436 Batley Road, Brookbury. On July 30, the service is in Lennoxville at the St. George’s Church. For details, visit deaneryofstfrancis.com and click on the “Calendar” link. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by July 10 for publication August 2, or by August 7 for August 16.

Rachel Garber

STEPPING OUT

So many places to step out and about, now that the snow has abated.
June 23+ EATON CORNER MUSEUM
The season begins at the Eaton Corner Museum, 374 Route 253, Cookshire-Eaton. The doors are open weekends, June 23-25 and July 1-2, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Then, beginning July 6, the opening hours are Thursday to Sunday, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., until the end of August. Admission charged. Info: email eatoncorner59@gmail.com, or call Sharon at 819-837-2643 until the Museum’s phone problems are resolved.
June 23: CONCERT CANTERBURY
Traditional Quebec music, complete with guitar, mandolin, accordion, violin, bass, and voice: A concert by Paula Chiasson, Normand Breton, and Christian Nolet, celebrating Saint-Jean-Baptiste Day at the Canterbury Center, 1095 Victoria Road (Route 214). This is part of the Center’s fundraising campaign to restore its small windows. The concert is on Friday, June 23, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15. To get yours, call Ed Pedersen at 819-872-3400.
June 30+ CANADA DAY
Friday evening and all day Saturday, June 30 and July 1st, in Bury. See details in English in an article in this Journal.
End of June+ MURMURS
Time travel back to the beginnings of the Eaton Townships through outdoor images projected onto the walls of Victoria Hall and other buildings. All summer, beginning at nightfall, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays. Murmures du Canton, at the Parc des Braves, 85 Principale West, Cookshire.
July 2+ CONCERTS COOKSHIRE
Outdoors in the Parc des Braves at 85 avenue du Parc in the heart of Cookshire on Sundays at 5 p.m. are three concerts free of charge, open to all.
July 2: A duet by flutists Marilène Provencher-Leduc and Alexis Dubois will offer a repertoire that roams from baroque to contemporary music.
July 23: Now the musicians are five: The DeVito Brass Quintet (Robin Doyon and Frédéric Gagnon on trumpets, Gabriel Gauthier-Beaudoin on horn, Martin Ringuette on trombone, and Jean-Philippe Dutil on tuba). Expect an eclectic and entertaining journey from baroque to jazz, including film music.
August 27: The SaxoLogie Ensemble is a quartet of saxaphones: soprano (Louis-Philippe Bonin), alto (Stéphane Jackson), tenor (Clio Theodoridis), and baritone (Jean-Philippe Godard). Their repertoire of chamber music promises to amaze, from baroque to modern, including works by Glass, Piazzola, and Browning.
July 7+ HARP & HAMMOCKS
Sérénité Sonore offers a new approach to enjoying the stars in our beloved Dark Sky Reserve. Beside the Cloutier Pond, lie back in a hammock-chair under the night sky, while enjoying a concert of harp music. Breathe.
This relaxing experience is offered by Sérénité Sonore’s founder, Annabelle Renzo, and organized by the Espace culturel Cookshire-Eaton. A series of eight concerts are open for small groups of up to 15 persons. On Friday evenings and the week of the Persiades, the dates to choose from are July 7, 14, and 28; August 4, 11, 12, and 18; and September 1st, from 9 to 10 p.m. (“Doors” open at 8:30 p.m.). The location is the Cloutier Pond, 675 Grenier Road, Cookshire-Eaton. The fee is $60 plus taxes, or $73.22. Per concert. Accessible for persons with limited mobility. By reservation only. Email: galeriecookshireeaton@gmail.com. Website: galeriedartcookshireeaton.com. At this writing, 11 hammocks are still available.
July 11&25 CARD PARTIES
At Brookbury Hall: Card parties on Tuesdays, July 11 and 25, at 1:30 p.m. For a seat at the card and lunch tables, the fee is $8/person. The Hall’s new address is 571 Brookbury Road (aka Route 255). Info: Brenda Bailey, 819-884-5984.
July 29&30; SEPT.23 SALES
A Flea Market/Marché aux puces and Farmers’ Market are planned for the Canterbury Center on Saturday and Sunday, July 29 and 30. The organizers seek donations of small items and antiques. To arrange to drop off donations, or to have them picked up if your mobility is reduced, call 819-872-3400. The Canterbury Center is located at 1095 Route 214, Canterbury.
At Brookbury Hall is planned a community garage sale on September 23, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. To reserve a large table (fee $10) and sell your wares, contact Brenda Bailey, 819-884-5984.
Aug. 5 POTLUCK
The Canterbury Center hosts a Community Potluck Supper on Saturday, August 5, starting at 4:30 p.m. Ed Pederson says, “Everyone is welcome. Candy Coleman is organizing the menu, so she will call you if you participated in 2019. If you are new to Canterbury Cuisine, you can call her at 819-657-4661.” The Canterbury Center is located at 1095 Route 214, Canterbury.
Now: FANTASTICAL

Just two more weeks to catch Paul Grégoire’s three fantastical exhibits: Gordian Knots, Cauchemar d’enfant, and La Chrysalide. All three are at the Galerie d’Art Cookshire-Eaton at 125 Principale West, Cookshire, until July 2.
Until June 25, the Gallery is open on Saturday and Sunday, noon to 4 p.m., and from June 26 to July 2, on Wednesday to Sunday, from noon to 5 p.m.
Now: PARSONS BOOK
New! Stay at home and explore the little historical village of Canterbury on Victoria Road (um, Route 214). Author Gordon Parsons has memorialized it in a large book in full colour, The Community of Canterbury, Quebec. Info: gordparsons@hotmail.com.
CHURCHES
Baptist. In-person Sunday services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All services are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Anglican. Sunday services are on June 25 at 10 a.m., at St. John’s Anglican Church, 436 Batley Road, Brookbury, and on July 2, at 10 a.m. at the St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 45 Principale West, Cookshire. For details, visit deaneryofstfrancis.com and click on the “Calendar” link. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. On June 25 will be one service, at Trinity United Church in Cookshire, at 10:30 a.m. On July 2nd, at 10:30 a.m., the service is at the Sawyerville United Church. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by June 26 for publication July 5, or by July 10 for August 2.

ACTU-Rachel

Garden Markets – Yum

The season of farmers’ markets is at hand. Let’s go on a tour.
First open is in Lingwick, at 60 Route 108, from 4 to 6 p.m., beginning this Friday and continuing until September 8.
The Compton market at 6747 Route Louis-S.-St-Laurent begins next week, Thursday June 15, and ends on September 14.
Next is in Dudswell, at the Parc Patrimonial, 167 Main St., on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon, from June 24 to September 16.
The Sawyerville market at the Sawyerville Community Garden, 70 Randboro Road, is open Saturdays from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. It goes from July 1st to September 30.
Bury’s market at the Memorial Park is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on every second Saturday, from July 15 to September 17.
Yum.
SCAM ALERT
I almost clicked on “SPAM,” but took a second look: “If you are contacted by phone, email or SMS text and offered a Canadian Tire Guaranteed Investment Certificate (GIC) – STOP. It’s a scam.”
This is a new little twist. In fact, Canadian Tire does not employ representatives to promote its GICs or other banking products, whether by phone, email or in person. Forewarned is forearmed.
WANTED: NUMBERS PERSON
Interested in accounting, or running a community cultural organisation? Want to learn? The Bury Historical and Heritage Society is looking for a new treasurer. The responsibilities? Keep the accounts of the Society up to date using an Excel software program, write cheques, maintain the Society’s charitable status in the Registre des entreprises du Québec and the Federal Charities Register, and prepare an annual report for the Annual General Meeting. A candidate should be able to communicate in French, and attend up to seven meetings per year in person or on Zoom. Training is provided. For a rewarding experience, please call Praxède Lévesque Lapointe at 819-872-3346 or Edward Pedersen at 514-273-3476.
TOWNSHIPS CHURCHES
Churches: a staple of Townships culture, inside and out. They come in all shapes and sizes. One was used by counterfeiters to dodge the law. To be a church, are walls needed? They start cemeteries, and some of them finish as cemeteries. Over the years, many have survived against all odds.
But what, now? Are cultural centres the new raison d’être of church buildings? Were churches not always centres of culture? The June issue of the Townships Sun explores all these facets; art and photos by Townships Young Voices award recipients. Available at the Cookshire IGA and Lachance Dépanneur in Sawyerville, or at townshipssun.ca/Subscribe.
CONCERT CANTERBURY
Traditional Quebec music, complete with guitar, mandolin, accordion, violin, bass, and voice: A concert by Paula Chiasson, Normand Breton, and Christian Nolet, celebrating Saint-Jean-Baptiste day at the Canterbury Center, 1095 Victoria Road (Route 214). This is part of the Center’s fundraising campaign to restore its small windows. The concert is on Friday, June 23, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15. To get yours, call Ed Pedersen at 819-872-3400.
CARD PARTIES
Coming up at Brookbury Hall: Card parties on Tuesdays, July 11 and 25, at 1:30 p.m. For a seat at the card and lunch tables, the fee is $8/person. The Hall’s new address is 571 Brookbury Road (aka Route 255). INFO: Brenda Bailey, 819-884-5984.
COMMUNITY GARAGE SALES
A Flea Market/Marché aux puces and Farmers’ Market is planned for the Canterbury Center on Saturday and Sunday, July 29 and 30. The organizers are seeking donations of small items and antiques. To arrange to drop off donations, or to have them picked up if your mobility is reduced, call 819-872-3400. The Canterbury Center is located at 1095 Route 214, Canterbury.
At Brookbury Hall is planned a community garage sale on September 23, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. To reserve a large table (fee $10) and sell your wares, contact Brenda Bailey, 819-884-5984.
CANTERBURY POTLUCK
The Canterbury Center hosts a Community Potluck Supper on Saturday, August 5, starting at 4:30 p.m. Ed Pederson says, “Everyone is welcome. Candy Coleman is organizing the menu, so she will call you if you participated in 2019. If you are new to Canterbury Cuisine, you can call her at 819-657-4661.” The Canterbury Center is located at 1095 Route 214, Canterbury.
FANTASTICAL
Tidbits from Paul Grégoire’s three meaty exhibits at the Galerie d’Art Cookshire-Eaton at 125 Principale West, Cookshire.
In Gordian Knots, you see intricate intertwining of fantastical creatures you would not expect to associate with each other, and a video about the artist’s bone museum and outdoor creations at his home in the Magdalen Islands. Climb three big steps, enter through a little door into the stage area (the Hanger), and you are in the Cauchemar d’enfant exhibit. Pick up the violin and try a few squeaks. It’s allowed! Downstairs, La Chrysalide documents the giant meandering steps of creating a sculpture out of a boat carcass and a whale… no, a seal skeleton.
Until June 25, the Gallery is open on Saturday and Sunday, noon to 4 p.m., and from June 26 to July 2, on Wednesday to Sunday, from noon to 5 p.m.
CHURCHES
Anglican. Sunday services are on June 11 at 10 a.m., at St. John’s Anglican Church, 170 Route 255 North, Brookbury, and on June 18 at 11 a.m. at the St. Peter’s Anglican Church, 45 Principale West, Cookshire. For details, visit deaneryofstfrancis.com and click on the “Calendar” link. Info: 819-887-6802, or quebec.anglican.ca.
United. Sunday services on June 11 and 18 are at 9:30 a.m. at the Trinity United Church in Cookshire, and at 11 a.m. at the Sawyerville United Church. On June 25 will be one service, at Trinity United Church in Cookshire, at 10:30 a.m. Info: 819-889-2838. For pastoral care, call Rev. Spires at 819-452-3685.
Baptist. In-person Sunday services are in French at 9 a.m. and in English at 11 a.m. All services are at the Sawyerville Baptist Church, 33 rue de Cookshire. For information, please contact Pastor Michel Houle at 819-889-2819.
Do you have news to share? Call 819-640-1340 or email rawrites@gmail.com by June 12 for publication June 21.

©2024 Journal Le Haut-Saint-François